ELDERLY WOMAN WEARING MOURNING DRESS IN EDMONTON, CANADA

This carte de visite portrait features an aged woman wearing mourning clothes. Her black dress, black hat, and sad expression, all suggest that she has suffered a recent loss. Her left hand is placed on a book atop a small table. The book is likely a bible. The photographer of this cdv photograph is J. R. Bentley. He operated a studio in Edmonton, Canada. Research found an ad in “The Photographic News” (1893) in which Bentley advertises the sale of his studio. It is very interesting to note that the advertising on the reverse of this CDV refers to Bentley as a “Portrait, Landscape, & Equestrian Photographer”. I do not remember ever seeing a early photographer refer to himself as a “Equestrian” photographer. I wonder if Mr. Bentley took photos of individual horses, or if he photographed individuals sitting on horses. I hope someday I locate one of Bentley’s equestrian photographs.

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Published in: on April 6, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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BEAUTIFUL MEMORIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF AN ADORABLE CHILD POSING NEXT TO LATE MOTHER’S PORTRAIT

This cabinet card portrait is one of those special photographs that appears to be trying to tell the viewer a story. Here is the story as I see it. An adorable and well dressed young child stands on a chair next to the photo portrait of his/her mother. The child’s mother has died and this cabinet card photograph was taken to serve as a keepsake memorial photo. The child can refer to this photo to preserve the memory of his/her mother. This image was beautifully photographed. The pose and the props, as well as the clarity of the image, help make this an exceptional photograph. The talented photographer of this cabinet card is the Bates & Nye Studio in Denver, Colorado. Photographer W. L. Bates appears in the 1881 Denver city directory under the occupation of photographer.  A Colorado genealogical site contends that Bates worked as a photographer in Denver between 1880 and 1890. Preliminary research yielded no information about the second partner in the gallery (Nye).   (SOLD)

Published in: on January 1, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PHOTOGRAPH OF A FUNERAL PROCESSION IN A SMALL LATVIAN VILLAGE

This vintage real photo postcard documents a funeral procession in a Latvian village (the postcard was found in a Latvian family album). The coffin holding the deceased is decorated with flowers and sits on a horse drawn wagon. The gentleman in the forefront is holding his hat and an umbrella while the older woman, dressed in traditional mourning garb, is clutching a bouquet of flowers. This photo postcard is from around the 1930’s. The image highlights how much in modern times we have changed the way we deal with death and funerals.

Published in: on November 26, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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A FAMILY OF FIVE IN MOURNING GATHER AROUND A POST MORTEM PHOTO OF BABY CARRIE

This cabinet card portrait is both interesting and sad. The photograph shows a family of five in mourning. They are dressed in dark clothing and on the table that they are sitting or standing by, is a cabinet card post-mortem photograph of a baby. On the reverse of this cabinet card is the inscription “Carrie Picture”. Clearly, someone has identified the baby as being named “Carrie”. This photograph was taken at the Bannister studio in St. Johns, Michigan. The Michigan Directory of Photographers reports that he operated his St Johns studio in 1895. The directory provides no first name for Mr. Bannister. It is my hypothesis that the photographer of the cabinet card portrait was Frank T. Bannister. He is listed as a photographer in the 1885 business directory for Saginaw, Michigan. He also appears in the 1910 US census as a photographer residing in New Richmond, Wisconsin.

Published in: on July 20, 2017 at 7:39 pm  Comments (2)  
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SOLEMN YOUNG WOMAN IN MOURNING IN TOPEKA, KANSAS

A young woman, perhaps a teenager, poses for her portrait at the Daylight Studio in Topeka, Kansas. She appears quite solemn and is wearing a black dress with black satin sashes and bows. Perhaps she is in mourning. The young lady is wearing a collar pin and a ring. She is beautifully dressed and is pretty despite her apparent discomfort at being photographed.

Published in: on July 19, 2017 at 7:32 pm  Comments (3)  
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FASHIONABLE WOMAN IN BLACK BEADED DRESS IN URBANA, OHIO

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The lady is in black, possibly in mourning. She is wearing a pretty black lace heavily beaded dress. A hair ornament in her hair, a corsage on her dress, and fingerless gloves complete her ensemble. The woman wears a serious expression and has piercing eyes. The lighting in this portrait is well done and highlights the woman and her dress. The photographer of this interesting cabinet card image is F. G. Wilhelmi who operated a photography studio in Urbana, Ohio. Fred G Wilhelmi, like many of photographer colleagues, got around. He appears to have begun his photography career in Cumberland, Maryland (1871-1880). He then practiced his trade in Urbana (1885-1889) and Cleveland (1890- 1900 or later). The dates provided are approximate and come from two guides about early Ohio photographers.

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Published in: on January 2, 2017 at 12:15 pm  Comments (3)  
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POSSIBLE MEMORIAL PORTRAIT OF A MAN IN KEWAUNEE, WISCONSIN

tree design

This cabinet card is unusual in that the portrait of the subject (man) is placed over a drawing of a stark winter scene. It is likely that the gentleman’s portrait is framed in this manner because the cabinet card is meant to be a memorial or mourning photograph. I have never seen a cabinet card with this type of border design. The photographer of this image is the Mutzbauer studio in Kewaunee, Wisconsin. The Mutzbauer studio was located in Kewaunee between 1887 and 1896. It later operated in Milwaukee, and it appears to have closed in 1928. The studio was started by Joseph Mutzbauer (1856-1915). He had two children that went into his business, Joseph L. Mutzbauer (1884-1965) and Louise Mutzbauer Macosta (1880-?).   SOLD

Published in: on March 26, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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A BEREAVED WOMAN IN THE WOODS IN McPHERSON, KANSAS (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

MRS VREELAND_0004This cabinet card features a well dressed woman dressed in black and holding a handkerchief. The woman appears to be dressed in mourning clothes. On the reverse of the cabinet card is the following pre printed quotation “Secure the shadow ere the substance fades”. This quotation was commonly used in the photographic community in advertising to encourage people to photograph their deceased relatives to keep their memory alive. The next part of the “secure the shadow” quotation is “Let nature imitate what nature made”. It was not uncommon to photograph corpses in life-like poses or in caskets, deathbeds, or other household furniture during the cabinet card era. See cabinet card gallery category “Memorial Card”. This photograph seems to be more of a mourning card than a memorial card, though one can’t be certain. The photographer of this image is Mrs. Vreeland who operated the “leading gallery” in McPherson, Kansas. To view other photographs by female photographers click on the category “Female Photographers”. To view other photographs by Mrs. Vreeland, click on the category “Photographer: Vreeland”.

MOURNING IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

This cabinet card photograph captures an older woman dressed in her mourning clothes. She has suffered a loss and is wearing black. The woman is also wearing earrings and a matching collar pin. The clarity of this image is notable. The photographic studio is Elite; located at No. 838 Market Street, San Francisco, California. The photographers are Jones & Lotz, who are listed on the reverse of the card. To view more of their photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Jones & Lotz”.

Published in: on September 3, 2010 at 3:46 pm  Comments (1)  
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MOURNING IN PORTLAND, MAINE

This Cabinet Card may be a mourning card; a photograph of a woman in grief over the loss of a loved one. Sadness permeates this cabinet card and the woman’s expression. The photographer is Joseph Harrison Lamson (1840-1901) of Portland, Maine. The photographer’s father was a maker of daguerrotypes and his mother was an artist. He began his career in photography in Bangor, Maine and then worked in Cuba, the West Indies, and South America. He made a fortune and then bought a studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then moved to Maine and operated a photographic studio in Portland. He photographed the poets Longfellow and Whittier. When he died, his two sons took over the studio.