PORTRAIT OF AN EARLY COLLEGE AGE FOOTBALL PLAYER

This vintage real photo postcard is a memento from the early history of football. This warrior of the gridiron stands at attention for his sports portrait. He appears to be college age and may be a member of a college football team. He is wearing his practice uniform and this image certainly reminds us of the major changes that have taken place over the years in the realm of sports equipment technology. This postcard has a divided back as well as a white border. It was likely produced during the White Border Era (1915-1930). The white borders were a method employed to help postcard publishers save on the expense of ink. This postcard is in good condition and the reverse of the card indicates that it once resided in a postcard album.

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2456

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$30.00

 

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes International shipping outside the US) #2456

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$38.00

 

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PORTRAIT OF AN ICE SKATER AND HIS FRIEND IN MONROE, MICHIGAN

This vintage photograph features two young men wearing overcoats. The men are wearing gloves and are dressed for winter weather. One of the young men has a pair of ice skates draped over his shoulders. Perhaps his next stop, after having his portrait taken, is to a local frozen lake where he can enjoy some ice skating. This photo was taken at the Beck  studio in Monroe, Michigan. The photograph measures about 5″ x 7″ and is in very good condition (see scans).

Buy this original Vintage Photograph (includes shipping to the US) #2432

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$31.50

 

Buy this original Vintage Photograph (includes International shipping outside the US) #2432

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$39.50

 

Published in: on June 8, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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TOMMY RHETT: UNSPECTACULAR FLYWEIGHT BOXER WEARING SPECTACULAR YANKEE BOXING SHORTS

Meet boxer Tommy Rhett. He fought out of New York, and the website BoxRec lists him as a flyweight.  He began his boxing career in 1947 and battled his way to 1955. At first, his career got off to a promising start. He won his first five fights (1 by KO). In his next 21 fights, he lost 19 bouts. He had the unfortunate distinction of losing his last 16 fights. He finished his career with 7 wins and 19 losses. Tommy Rhett appears to have been a journeyman fighter. Apparently, after a few fights he became fodder for other boxers to improve their record. Rhett must have been frustrated and disappointed with his performance in the ring. Tommy was no champion, but he sure wore terrific boxing shorts. The logo on his shorts is the same logo that is currently worn by the New York Yankees. A little investigating revealed that the logo has a connection to Tiffany’s. The interlocking “NY” logo was designed by the jewelry store in 1877,  as part of a Medal of Valor for a NYPD officer who was shot in the line of duty. The 1909 season marked the first time the New York Highlanders used the logo in its present form. The Highlanders became the New York Yankees in 1913.

VINTAGE PORTRAIT OF A UNIFORMED FOOTBALL TEAM

This vintage real photo postcard features a portrait of a football team. These eleven heroes of the gridiron are wearing their uniforms for this group photograph. Six of the young men are wearing their helmets. Unfortunately, these thin leather helmets didn’t offer much protection against concussions or Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). At first glance, I thought this team may actually be a rugby team. I based my impression on the odd shape and size of the football. The ball looked more like a rugby ball than a football. A little investigating revealed that today’s football has evolved over time. Basically, footballs have gone from round, to watermelon shaped, to today’s shaped football. The modern football became commonly used in 1935. In 1869 (first collegiate football game), the ball used was round, resembling a soccer ball. In 1874, a rugby-type ball was introduced. Shaped like a watermelon, it was as difficult to throw as the round ball. In 1912, an oversized version of today’s football was introduced. This football gave the quarterback more control of the ball when passing. The football in this photo postcard appears to be the rugby style ball, and that is compatible with the AZO stamp box which indicates that this portrait was taken between 1904 and 1918. The players and their team are unidentified. 

Published in: on March 20, 2018 at 12:20 pm  Comments (7)  
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MEET THE PIN BOYS: OCCUPATIONAL SNAPSHOT TAKEN AT A BOWLING ALLEY

 

This snapshot captures three pin boys as they work at a bowling alley. Pin boys, also known as pin setters were stationed in a sunken area of a bowling alley which was located behind the pins. The pin boy removed pins after they were knocked down, replaced pins each frame, and returned the bowlers ball. The day of pin boys is long over as automation and computers became employed in bowling alleys. At least two of the young men in this photo are smoking while they are working. The pin boys are wearing tee shirts, presumably because they were exerting themselves in a hot environment. Being a pin boy doesn’t look like a fun job.

Published in: on June 12, 2017 at 9:59 pm  Comments (2)  
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PORTRAIT OF A BASKETBALL PLAYER (ST. MARY’S, 1925)

This wonderful photographic portrait features a basketball player in his game day uniform. Note his high top sneakers and long athletic socks. His uniform reveals that he played for St. Mary’s. There were many schools called St. Mary’s so it is unclear where the school was located or whether it was a high school or a college. Writing on the basketball discloses that this photograph was taken in 1925. There is a name inscribed on the reverse of the photograph but it is hard to decipher. The photo measures about 5 5/8 x 3 3/4 and is on paper that has the consistency of postcard paper.

Published in: on June 9, 2017 at 1:07 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF THREE OLD TIME BASEBALL PLAYERS (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

Welcome to Mudville. This vintage real photo postcard features three uniformed baseball players. The young men are wearing the uniform of St. Joseph school. Two of the players are wearing fielding gloves and the player in the middle is equipped with a catcher’s glove. The ball players appear to be standing on a ball field in front of empty bleachers. The AZO stamp box on the reverse of this photo postcard indicates that the postcard was published sometime between 1926 and the 1940’s.

Published in: on March 7, 2017 at 9:02 pm  Leave a Comment  
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CUTE LITTLE GIRL WITH A PAIL AND SHOVEL IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

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This cabinet card portrait features a little girl with an engaging smile. She is holding a wooden pail and is standing next to a shovel. She posed in front of the studio’s proverbial wall which the photographer embellished with leafy vines. The photographer of this image is Carl Joseph Horner (1864-1926). He operated a studio in Boston, Massachusetts. I have seen him advertise himself on other images as a “European Photographer”. On the reverse of this cabinet card he describes himself more precisely geographically as being “from Stockholm, Sweden”. It appears that, at least in Boston, European photographers held more status than American photographers. Interestingly, Horner developed a great reputation as a sports photographer. Some of his baseball photographs are very well known. To view more of his images, and to learn more about this photographer, click on the category “Photographer: Horner”.

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Published in: on January 17, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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“BEST TEAM EVER”: TEAM PHOTO OF A WOMENS BASKETBALL TEAM (1923 VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH)

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This wonderful vintage photograph features a Womens Basketball team which apparently just completed a championship season. The image includes seven girls in uniform and their coach. Three of the girls are holding trophies. All of the girls look like their having a good time. There is an abundance of smiles as the photographer shoots his picture. Even the coach seems to be enjoying the moment. As customary, the basketball has been marked with the date. The girls are celebrating completion of the 1923 season. Their team’s name and their location are unidentified. This image is an important piece of womens basketball history. Note the girls uniforms and their sneakers. There appears to be some variety in their footwear. The reverse of the photograph has an inscription that must summarize the girl’s experiences as a member of the basketball squad. The writing happily declares “Ye Old Team….Best Ever”. This vintage photograph measures about 8″x10″.

SOLD

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Published in: on September 5, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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‘WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS”: TEAM PHOTO OF WOMENS BASKETBALL TEAM IN RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY (1926)

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The ten girls featured in this vintage photograph are members of a girls basketball team. The basketball is marked indicating that this is a team photo from 1926. Writing on the reverse of the photograph informs us that this team was the “Interclass Basketball Champions of 1926 (Freshman). In addition, all of the players in the image are named on the back of the photo. “Top Row: Eleanor Einerson, Betty Stillwell, Helen (Boby) Moser, Vivian Grey, Yvonne Muser”. Team members in the bottom row are “Mary Webb, Helen Hendrickson, Sarah Temple (Captain), Betty Hukill, Martha Arrigoni”. Kudos to the internet because I was able to use these names to find the location of where these girls went to school and played basketball.  Research revealed that these girls resided in the area of Ridgewood, New Jersey. All of the girls were born in, or around, 1912. This post-cabinet card era photograph measures about 4 1/2″ x 2 3/4″.

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Published in: on July 21, 2016 at 5:25 pm  Leave a Comment  
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