MISS SARI PETRASS : BEAUTIFUL HUNGARIAN SINGER AND ACTRESS WHO BECAME AN INTERNATIONAL STAR (TWO REAL PHOTO POSTCARDS)

 POSTCARD 1

petrass POSTCARD 2 

Sari Petrass (1888-1930) was a Hungarian operetta actress and singer. She played leading soprano parts during the 1910’s and 1920’s. She appeared all over the globe. She gave performances in Budapest, Vienna, London, and Broadway. In 1911 she made her debut as a lead singer in a show in Budapest. The show became an international hit. Petrass wasted little time learning to sing in English. She performed in “Gipsy Love” (1912) at England’s Daly’s Theatre. The show ran for 299 performances. She next appeared at Daly’s in “The Marriage Market” (1913). This postcard features her in the role of “Mariposa Gilroy” in that show. She appeared alongside Gertie Millar. Interestingly, Petrass was a skillful horse rider and had an opportunity to ride a donkey in the opening scene of the play. The show ran for 423 performances. A photo from the show can be seen below. Sari Petrass and her costar, Robert Michaelis are seen in the photograph.  In 1916, Petrass was the subject of a rumor in America. It was falsely reported that she was executed in Hungary for being a British spy during World War 1. It was “fake news”. In late 1916, she moved to New York where she starred in “Miss Springtime” at the New Amsterdam Theatre on Broadway. In 1917, she married a Long Island stock broker named Felix Augustus Eugene Sommerhoff. Sommerhoff was the nephew of composer Robert Schumann. Petrass continued performing after her marriage. In 1930, Sari Petrass and a friend (Lady Horne) were killed in an accident while in Belgium. Their chaufffeur was attempting to drive onto a ferry but he was blinded by beam from a lighthouse and crashed into the Scheldt River. Both Petrass, and her friend, died from drowning.                                                                                                                               

Postcard 1 is part of the “Arcadian Series” (no. A 67). The publisher was formerly The Arcadia Bazaar Co and was also known as the A B Company based in Ramsgate, England. Petrass was a sitter in six portraits in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery. The photographer of this image is Rita Martin. Miss Martin was well known for her expertise in taking portraits of theater stars and other celebrities. The message on the reverse of the postcard is signed in a cute manner, “Heaps of Love, Lucy”. This vintage photo portrait postcard is in good condition (see scans and note the corners of the card).             

Postcard 2 is a close-up portrait of Miss Petrass. Her beauty is captured in this photograph by Rita Martin. The postcard is published by Beagles Postcards as part of a series (no. 218 K). The publishing house was located in London, England. This vintage real photo postcard is in excellent condition (see scans).

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$13.50

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$22.00

Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2902

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$31.50

Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes International shipping outside the US) #2902

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$40.00

 

 POSTCARD 1

petrass 1 POSTCARD 2

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DAISY JEROME : SCANDALOUS STAGE ACTRESS WHO WAS VIEWED AS RAUCOUS, VULGAR, AND “AN ACQUIRED TASTE”

This rare vintage real photo postcard features the red headed actress that electrified the Australian stage. She was noted for her famous wicked wink. The life and times of Daisy Jerome can best be described as scandalous. She arrived in Australia in 1913 for a three year stage tour.  Feminism was rising in the western world. Suffragettes were marching for the right to vote. Women were smoking, driving, wearing less conservative fashion, and even dancing the tango with it’s sexual overtones. She arrived in Adelaide adorned with an excess of jewelry. She was born in America but raised in England. Her place of birth was New York and she was born Daisy Witkowski in 1886. Daisy reported that she was raised in a multilingual household that had been visited by Presidents Lincoln, McKinley, and Roosevelt. After experiencing financial problems, her father moved the family to England. Money was needed and Daisy followed her sister onto the stage. She played the Palace and toured with companies that gave her a chance to do comedic singing and pantomime. Her performances were considered to be amusing and irreverent. She was a comedienne. Her humor has been described as “vibrant” and “wicked”. Daisy was described as “feisty”, “cunning”, and “independent”. She was small and dainty and had compelling eyes and an expressive face. Her performances had a risque tone and she had a hoarse, sensual voice. She could toe dance and wooden shoe dance, but was most known as a mimic and comnic singer. After a year of marriage, she deserted her first husband to live with another man. In 1910, she took a journalist to court for libel. The reporter had accused her of performing encores when audiences had not requested them. She claimed that her professional reputation had been damaged. The court case was a circus. The defense ridiculed one of her songs which caused her to break into tears in the witness chair. She won the case but was barely compensated. When she began her tour of Australia, she was recognized as raucous, vulgar and “an acquired taste”. She quickly charmed those that were hesitant to appreciate her and she soon received a warm welcome and a complimentary nickname, “The Electric Spark”. Her carrot red hair became the subject of much debate. She claimed it was her natural color but most people were not believers of her claim. One day, an Australian comedian told her that a gentleman had taken offence to her hair. The comedian said that the offended man would visit her that night. The comedian then informed the local fire chief that there was great risk of fire during Daisy’s time on stage. The worried fireman came to the theatre and when he saw Daisy’s red hair, he realized he had been a victim of a joke. He kept the joke going when he said that he agreed there was risk of fire and he ordered the scenery to be fireproofed immediately. During Daisy Jerome’s era, there was a bias against redheads. They were considered to be hot tempered and sexually wild and uninhibited. Her theater/music hall background only magnified some people’s negative view of Daisy. After completing her touring contract in Australia, she signed another one. This time she performed on a vaudeville stage which allowed her to showcase her bawdy songs. In 1914 she sang a feminist style song called “The Press, the Pulpit, and the Petticoat”. This song argued that women were more powerful and influential than the media and the church. Daisy was a woman who had unconventional ideas. She would not restrained by political correctness. She stated in a 1914 interview that “I refuse to regulate my acts to accepted rules of conduct”. Despite her views, she remained popular with Australian audiences. She left Australia in 1916 and returned in 1922 for another successful tour. Later, she was involved in another court case which this time involved her suing her maid over missing jewels. With the arrival and subsequent popularity of films, Daisy Jerome faded out of the public’s focus. Two photo portraits of Daisy Jerome can be found in England’s National Portrait Gallery. This vintage postcard was published by J. Beagles & Co. of London, England as part of a series (No. 109 A). The company was started by John Beagles (1844-1909). The company produced a variety of postcards including an extensive catalog of celebrity (stage and screen) portrait postcards. After Beagle’s death, the business continued under it’s original name until it closed in 1939. Miss Jerome’s portrait was taken by the Hutchinson & Svendsen studio. The National Portrait Gallery asserts that this pair of photographers were active in London between 1905 and 1906. This vintage photo postcard is in excellent condition (see scans). This postcard portrait of Daisy Jerome is absolutely beautiful and very uncommon.  (SOLD)

 

 

MISS MARIE BLANCHE : TRANSITIONED FROM A PEACOCK TO A STARLET

The pretty actress seen in this vintage real photo postcard, is Miss Marie Blanche (c 1893-1973). Her birth name was Marie Peacock and she was born in Scarborough, England. Her father was stage actor William Peacock. She was a child stage actress in the early 1900’s. Later she became a starlet when she appeared in a few comedy and drama films. One of her important roles was in the silent film drama, “The Great Impostor” (1918). In 1919 she appeared in “The Elusive Pimpernel” for the Stoll Film Company. She was married to E. Lewis Waller (1884-1951), a stage and screen actor. Blanche’s IMDb filmography reveals that she appeared in four films between 1918 and 1924. She was a sitter in eight portraits that are part of the National Portrait Gallery’s collection. The portrait of Miss Blanche seen on this postcard was photographed by Rita Martin. Miss Martin was well known for her expertise in taking portraits of theater stars and other celebrities. She was considered one of the best British photographers of her time. She opened her studio in 1906. Martin’s sister, Lallie Charles was an esteemed society photographer. The Cabinet Card Gallery has several photographs by Rita Martin. Place her name in the search box to peruse them. The postcard was printed and published by J. Beagles & Company of London, England. The company was started by John Beagles (1844-1909). The company produced a variety of postcards including an extensive catalog of celebrity (stage and screen) portrait postcards. After Beagle’s death, the business continued as J. Beagles & Co. until it closed in 1939.  (SOLD) 

MISS GRACE CHALMERS – HER TALENT PROVES THAT GREAT “ACTRESSES ARE BORN AND NOT MADE”

mess chalmers

mess chalmers 1 This vintage real photo postcard features stage actress Grace Chalmers. Her portrait can be found at Britain’s National Portrait Gallery. Research reveals that Miss Chalmers received acclaim for her role as “Glory Quayle” in “The Christian”. A photo of Grace Chalmers, with a brief caption, appears in the “Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News (1908). She is reviewed in the magazine, “Navy and Army Illustrated” (1905). The reviewer must have been impressed with her acting. He points out that Miss Chalmers has “wonderful histrionic abilities” despite her lack of theatrical training and theatrical genes. According to the writer, Chalmers talent roves that “actresses are born and not made”. This vintage postcard was published by J. Beagles of London, England. It is part of a series (no. 289D). Miss Chalmers portrait was photographed by Denton & Co.. This postcard is in excellent condition (see scans).

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2729

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mess chalmers 2

PORTRAITS OF EVELYN MILLARD: SHAKESPEARIAN STAGE ACTRESS (VINTAGE RPPC)

POSTCARD 1  (SOLD)

millard 2

POSTCARD 2  (SOLD)

millard

POSTCARD 3  (SOLD)

MILLARD 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                               POSTCARD 4  #2466

                                                         The top vintage real photo postcard (#1) features  a portrait of English stage actress Evelyn Millard (1869-1941). She was well known for her acting in Shakespearian theater as well as for her beauty. She is also noted for creating the role of Cecily Cardewin in the premier of Oscar Wildes play “The Importance of Being Earnest” (1895). This postcard was produced by the Rotary Photo Company of London, England.

    The second postcard is a portrait of Miss Millard taken by the Davidson Brothers studio in London, England. The postcard is part of a series (“Real Photographic Series” no. 2195). Davidson Brothers was located in both London and New York City. The firm operated between 1901 and 1911. Some of their theatrical postcard portraits have the same format as many of the Rotograph photo cards.  This postcard was postmarked in South Lambeth in 1907. Lambeth is a district in Central London. The writer of the message on this postcard starts the communication with “Dear Lizzie, I think this is one of your favorites”. Most likely the writer was stating that Evelyn Millard was one of the favorite actresses of the recipient of the postcard. Collecting postcard images of theatrical stars was certainly quite popular at the time this postcard was written.

The third postcard is color tinted and was produced by the Rotary Postcard Co. as part of the Rotary Photographic Series ( no. 191G). The photographer was T. C. Turner who operated studios in London and Hull, England. Thomas Charles Turner (1839-1896) operated his London studio between 1870 and 1900. Millard is clearly in costume for this portrait. Note her unusual pin. It looks like a multi-eyed horror movie insect. This vintage postcard is in very good condition (see scans).

Postcard number four is rare. Miss Millard looks quite beautiful and is dressed in an exquisite gown. Note, that unlike most of her other portrait postcards, Evelyn has blonde hair. Most of her photo postcards show her with dark hair. It is very possible, even likely, that she is wearing a wig in this portrait. The photographer of this image was the Lafayette studio. The firm was founded in Dublin in 1880 by James Stack Lauder. His father, Edmund Lauder was a pioneering and successful photographer. The elder Lauder used the name “Lafayette’ to give the company a touch of Paris, which was a a city considered the center of the art and photography world. James was joined in business by his three photographer brothers. By the 1900, the company had studios in Glasgow, Manchester, London and Belfast. The studio also was invited to photograph Queen Victoria. The company still exists today. This postcard was published by J. Beagles & Co. of London, England. The postcard is part of a series (no. G 511.P). The “G” is an abbreviation for “glossy”. There was also a matte version of this postcard portrait. John Beagles (1844-1909) was born in England. At age 17 he was a “pupil teacher”. In the census of 1891, he is listed as a “photographic publisher” in Nottingham. Later he established J. Beagles & Co. in London. He and his successors produced a variety of postcards including an extensive catalog of celebrity (stage and screen) portrait postcards. The firm also published topographic and view cards, as well as a series called “Matrimonial Cats”. After Beagle’s death, the business continued as J. Beagles & Co. until it closed in 1939. This postcard has great clarity and is in excellent condition.                                     

MILLARD 4

    POSTCARD 4         

 

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                                                                   POSTCARD  1

millard 2 1

                                                                       POSTCARD 2

millard3                                                                   POSTCARD 3

                                                                                                MILLARD 4 2        POSTCARD 4