RISQUE PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN BY ALFRED NOYER

This french vintage real photo postcard is a wonderful example of Alfred Noyer’s work photographing nude, or partially clad, beautiful women. Noyer was a well known and acclaimed photographer. His Paris studio operated between 1910 and the 1940’s. Many of the postcards he produced featured nudes or risque images. This photo portrait postcard is part of a series (no.9517) and is in excellent condition (see scans).

Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #3064

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$39.48

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$47.98

PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY DANCER WEARING AN UNUSUAL RISQUE COSTUME

This vintage real postcard features a costumed young woman. The image is a bit risque for it’s time. There is a lot of leg showing. The costume is an enigma. What culture or ethnicity is her costume meant to represent. Her hat is best described as sombreroesque. One collector has hypothesized that she is a cowgirl. Perhaps she is a dancer. I am not sure why her outfit has fringes only over the right arm and the left leg. Did the designer run out of material? Just kidding. This postcard likely has an interesting background story but I am afraid that it is lost to history. An inscription on the front of the postcard indicates that the postcard is from 1920. This vintage postcard is in very good condition (see scans).

Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #3017

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$32.49

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$40.99

Published in: on March 3, 2020 at 5:34 pm  Comments (1)  
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MISS ALEX: PARISIAN ENTERTAINER : PHOTOGRAPHED BY LUCIEN WALERY (1903)

This vintage real photo postcard was mailed in 1903 and features Miss Alex, a lesser known actress or dancer of the Belle Epoque era. She was quite pretty. Many entertainers such as Miss Alex, were more or less prostitutes or “kept women”. Certainly, not all of these women were involved in such a lifestyle, and it is unknown how Miss Alex supported herself. The “Ambassadeurs”, a Paris music hall, is printed on the top right hand corner of the front of the postcard. Miss Alex was probably part of the Ambassadeur’s company of entertainers. This portrait postcard was photographed by Lucien Walery. He was a celebrated Paris photographer known for his portraits of artists and cabaret dancers from the city’s music halls. He is very well known for his portraits of Mata Hari and Josephine Baker. Walery did a lot of work in the genre of nude/erotic photography. He photographed the beautiful women of Paris between the early 1900’s and the 1920’s. This “risque” postcard is part of the Etoile 11 series and is in good condition (see scans).                                               

Buy this Vintage Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2951

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$16.15

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$24.65

TWO PRETTY SEMI-NUDE WOMEN HAVING TEA IN ALGERIA

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This vintage ethnographic photo postcard features two pretty semi-nude Algerian women. They are wearing traditional garb of their culture. The women appear to be preparing for some tea. The postcard is from circa 1930’s. Google translate reveals that the caption on the reverse of the postcard states “Picturesque Algeria. Tea in the interior”. The card is part of a series (Serie I. – No 4). The photographer of these ladies has the last name of “Albert”. This vintage postcard measures about 5 3/4″x 5 7/8″.  (SOLD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published in: on December 20, 2019 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A BEDOUIN BEAUTY IN CAIRO, EGYPT (PHOTOGRAPH BY LEHNERT & LANDROCK)

This vintage postcard features a “Bedouin Beauty” with  wonderful smile. Everything she is wearing is interesting. Her traditional dress, the flowers in her hair, and her necklace are all intriguing. This postcard offers some sexual provocativeness which was typically seen in ethnographic postcards from this era. It seems that if women from other cultures, or non white ethnicities, were photographed for postcards, than some nudity was acceptable. Western photographers, postcard publishers, and postcard consumers all appear to have been “suffering” from ethnocentrism. The woman in this photo, as stated earlier, is a Bedouin. Bedouins are a group of nomadic Arab people. Historically, they have inhabited the desert regions in the Arabian Peninsula, North Africa, Iraq, and the Levant. This image was produced by the team of Rudolf Franz Lehnert (1878-1948) & Ernst Heinrich Landrock (1878-1966). Lehnert was of German origin, while Landrock was from Bohemia. The pair met in Switzerland and decided to go into business together. Lehnert was the photographer and Landrock was the administrator. Landrock organized trips, managed the photo studio and photo production, and marketed the photographs and prints. They were photographers in Tunis and in Egypt, They also opened studios in Munich (Germany) and Leipzig (Germany).  They produced many photographs from Egypt and Tunisia. Their first studio was in Tunis. They photographed monuments and sites in those countries, but were most known for their erotic images of Arab women, often posing in harem themes. The photographers seemed more concerned about producing erotic photographs rather than documenting everyday life in these Middle Eastern countries. Lehnert and Landrock were well acclaimed for their work and the duo have images in a number of museums, including Philadelphia’s Penn Museum an the Musee de l’elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland. This vintage postcard is in very good condition (see scans).

Buy this Vintage Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2945

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$29.33

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$37.83

DAISY JEROME : SCANDALOUS STAGE ACTRESS WHO WAS VIEWED AS RAUCOUS, VULGAR, AND “AN ACQUIRED TASTE”

This rare vintage real photo postcard features the red headed actress that electrified the Australian stage. She was noted for her famous wicked wink. The life and times of Daisy Jerome can best be described as scandalous. She arrived in Australia in 1913 for a three year stage tour.  Feminism was rising in the western world. Suffragettes were marching for the right to vote. Women were smoking, driving, wearing less conservative fashion, and even dancing the tango with it’s sexual overtones. She arrived in Adelaide adorned with an excess of jewelry. She was born in America but raised in England. Her place of birth was New York and she was born Daisy Witkowski in 1886. Daisy reported that she was raised in a multilingual household that had been visited by Presidents Lincoln, McKinley, and Roosevelt. After experiencing financial problems, her father moved the family to England. Money was needed and Daisy followed her sister onto the stage. She played the Palace and toured with companies that gave her a chance to do comedic singing and pantomime. Her performances were considered to be amusing and irreverent. She was a comedienne. Her humor has been described as “vibrant” and “wicked”. Daisy was described as “feisty”, “cunning”, and “independent”. She was small and dainty and had compelling eyes and an expressive face. Her performances had a risque tone and she had a hoarse, sensual voice. She could toe dance and wooden shoe dance, but was most known as a mimic and comnic singer. After a year of marriage, she deserted her first husband to live with another man. In 1910, she took a journalist to court for libel. The reporter had accused her of performing encores when audiences had not requested them. She claimed that her professional reputation had been damaged. The court case was a circus. The defense ridiculed one of her songs which caused her to break into tears in the witness chair. She won the case but was barely compensated. When she began her tour of Australia, she was recognized as raucous, vulgar and “an acquired taste”. She quickly charmed those that were hesitant to appreciate her and she soon received a warm welcome and a complimentary nickname, “The Electric Spark”. Her carrot red hair became the subject of much debate. She claimed it was her natural color but most people were not believers of her claim. One day, an Australian comedian told her that a gentleman had taken offence to her hair. The comedian said that the offended man would visit her that night. The comedian then informed the local fire chief that there was great risk of fire during Daisy’s time on stage. The worried fireman came to the theatre and when he saw Daisy’s red hair, he realized he had been a victim of a joke. He kept the joke going when he said that he agreed there was risk of fire and he ordered the scenery to be fireproofed immediately. During Daisy Jerome’s era, there was a bias against redheads. They were considered to be hot tempered and sexually wild and uninhibited. Her theater/music hall background only magnified some people’s negative view of Daisy. After completing her touring contract in Australia, she signed another one. This time she performed on a vaudeville stage which allowed her to showcase her bawdy songs. In 1914 she sang a feminist style song called “The Press, the Pulpit, and the Petticoat”. This song argued that women were more powerful and influential than the media and the church. Daisy was a woman who had unconventional ideas. She would not restrained by political correctness. She stated in a 1914 interview that “I refuse to regulate my acts to accepted rules of conduct”. Despite her views, she remained popular with Australian audiences. She left Australia in 1916 and returned in 1922 for another successful tour. Later, she was involved in another court case which this time involved her suing her maid over missing jewels. With the arrival and subsequent popularity of films, Daisy Jerome faded out of the public’s focus. Two photo portraits of Daisy Jerome can be found in England’s National Portrait Gallery. This vintage postcard was published by J. Beagles & Co. of London, England as part of a series (No. 109 A). The company was started by John Beagles (1844-1909). The company produced a variety of postcards including an extensive catalog of celebrity (stage and screen) portrait postcards. After Beagle’s death, the business continued under it’s original name until it closed in 1939. Miss Jerome’s portrait was taken by the Hutchinson & Svendsen studio. The National Portrait Gallery asserts that this pair of photographers were active in London between 1905 and 1906. This vintage photo postcard is in excellent condition (see scans). This postcard portrait of Daisy Jerome is absolutely beautiful and very uncommon.  (SOLD)

 

 

NUDE PORTRAIT OF PRETTY MODEL TAKEN BY CELEBRATED FRENCH PHOTOGRAPHER JEAN AGELOU (c. 1910)

This vintage real photo postcard features a risque photograph of an unidentified model. The photo portrait was taken by the talented an esteemed French photographer, Jean Agelou (1878-1921).He was a photographer of the 1910’s and 1920’s and was well known for his erotic and nude photographs. He was born in Egypt and not much is known about his private life. Agelou generally used models between the age of 20 and 24 years-old. He had a favorite model. Her name was “Fernande” and in addition to modeling, she was Agelou’s lover. Her full name was Fernande Barrey (1893-1960) and she was a prostitute by trade. She also modeled for painters (Amadeo Modigliani and Chaim Soutine). Although the 1900’s was the “golden age” of erotic photograph, photographers who took such risque photos had to use discretion. As a result, Agelou signed his work “JA”. In 1908, nudity in photographs was banned in France and photographers needed to cover images of nude women with strategically placed undergarments or other materials. Nude images had to circulate on the down low. They were sent in the mail inside of envelopes. Jean Agelou died in 1921; the result of a car accident. His brother George, who managed Jean’s business, also was killed in the crash. This postcard is part of a series (508) .   (SOLD)

Published in: on October 22, 2019 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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RISQUE PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY YOUNG WOMAN WEARING A BATHING SUIT OR LINGERIE (1920’S)

This vintage real photo postcard features a pretty young woman wearing either a bathing suit or lingerie. I can’t distinguish between the two types of clothing. Perhaps I need to enroll in a class at Victoria’s Secret University to enhance my knowledge about such things. This is a risque image for it’s era. The postcard was published in France by PC Paris, as part of a series (no. 2122). The P. C. logo is an abbreviation for Papeteries de Levallois-Clichy. The firm published a variety of real photo postcard topics including portraits of women, nudes, views, and holiday cards. The company was active in the 1920’s.   (SOLD)

Published in: on October 14, 2019 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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FIVE PRETTY BATHING BEAUTIES ALL IN A ROW : RISQUE

This vintage real photo postcard features five beautiful women wearing bathing suits and high stockings. This image was shot at an unidentified studio. The postcard is risque for it’s era. Four of the women have wonderful smiles. The bathing beauty at the end of the line appears to be keeping her smile in reserve. This vintage postcard is in very good condition.

Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2859

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$33.50

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$42.00

 

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Published in: on September 27, 2019 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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RISQUE PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN PARTIALLY DRESSED

This vintage photograph features a pretty young woman in a risque pose and wearing risque clothing. She is wearing a hat, gloves, and is holding a purse. She seems to be going somewhere but she forgot to finish getting dressed. The previous owner of this photograph thought the photographer of the image may have been the Biederer studio. I have no supporting evidence confirming his hypotheses. The Biederer brothers were major figures in photography so their story is worth telling. The studio was operated by Jacpues Biederer (1887-1942) and his brother Charles Biederer (1892-1942) during the Art deco era. Their studio was in Paris, France. Their photographs of the 1920’s and 1930’s included artistic nudes and sexual fetish studies. Their topics included erotic corporal punishment, costumed role play and images of bondage. Their postcards were signed as “JB” “B” ,”Ostra”, or a question mark in a triangle.  When Germany occupied France during World War ll, the Nazis sent the brothers to a concentration camp (Auschwitz-Birkenau). Their crime was their Judaism. Their punishment was death. This vintage photo measures about 3 3/8″ x 5 3/8″ and is in very good condition.

Buy this original Vintage Photograph (includes shipping within the US) #2814

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$27.50

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$36.00

Published in: on July 31, 2019 at 6:09 pm  Comments (1)  
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