MAIE ASH : TWO REAL PHOTO PORTRAIT POSTCARDS OF ENGLISH STAGE BEAUTY (1905 & 1906)

 POSTARD 1 (SOLD)

 POSTCARD 1 (SOLD)

maieashII POSTCARD 2

maieashII 1 POSTCARD 2 (MAGNIFIED)

These two real photo postcards features stage beauty, Maie Ash (1888-1923). She was an English comedy actress and dancer. She made her London debut in 1902 at Shaftesbury Theatre. The next year she played the title role in Cinderella in Southampton. Other appearances include “Goody Two Shoes” (1904), “Yellow Fog Island” (1907), and “My Darling” (1907). Ash played Miss Gibbs in “Our Miss Gibbs” (1911). A reviewer of the play, writing for the “Playgoer Weekly”,  suggests that Ash was charming in her role and that her singing voice resembled that of popular actress, Miss Ellaline Terriss.  The reviewer added that her singing and dancing brought the audience much pleasure and that she demonstrated herself to be a “most finished musical comedienne”. She married actor Stanley Brett in 1909. He was the brother of celebrated actor Seymour Hicks. The pair divorced in 1913, and in 1915, she married comedian Fred Allandale. Apparently, Miss Ash and Mr. Allandale didn’t wait for their divorces before getting involved romantically. Ash was named by Allandale’s wife and Allandale was named by Ashe’s husband in their respective divorce petitions. So much for impulse control. Ash was the sitter for six portraits in Britain’s National Portrait Gallery.

Postcard 1 features a fetching portrait of Maie Ash. She is wearing a beautiful smile and has pretty eyes. The card was published by Ralph Dunn & Company which operated in London, England. The post card is part of a series (no. A 105).  The card has a 1905 postmark. The message on this postcard wishes the recipient “Many happy returns of the day”. According to Wikipedia, this 18th century greeting is meant to offer the hope that each happy day is repeated by other happy days, The saying was often used on birthdays, and in particular, as a response to “Merry Christmans” and “Happy New Year” wishes. The word “returns” also was used to wish a person that their day yields much happiness.(SOLD)       

Postcard 2  presents a close-up photograph of Miss Ash. The postcard is a bit risque for it’s time. Her low cut dress and her coy expression accentuate the beauty of the alluring actress. This postcard was published by the Rotary Photo Company as part of their “Rotary Photographic Series (No. 1831K)”. This photo of Maie Ash was taken by the Johnston & Hoffmann studio. Theodore Julius Hoffmann and P. A. Johnston established a commercial photography studio in Calcutta (1882) and Darjeeling (1890). They also operated a studio in Simla. Johnston and Hoffmann’s photography business was the second largest commercial photography studio in India in that period. Many of their images were of North and Northeast India as well as Sikkim and Nepal. Johnston & Hoffmann produced many photographs of actors and actresses. It is certain that these performers did not travel to India to have their photo taken. It seems likely that Johnston & Hoffmann also had a studio in England during some part of their careers. It is also possible that there were to separate studios that coincidentally shared the same name. This postcard was postmarked in 1906 in Southampton, England. The postcard is in very good condition (see scans).                                                                                     

Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2905

To purchase this item, click on the Pay with PayPal button below

$15.50

Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes International shipping outside the US) #2905

To purchase this item, click on the Pay with PayPal button below

$24.00

 POSTCARD 1 (SOLD) 

maieashII 2 POSTCARD 2

Advertisements

COUPLE DRESSED AS RAJA AND GYPSY FOR “FANCY DRESS BALL” (INDIA 1894)

GYPSY INDIA

This cabinet card offers a fascinating portrait of a couple dressed for a costume party occurring in India. The couple are either in the country on holiday or perhaps the man is assigned to work there by his government. Inscriptions on the reverse of the photograph provide some explanatory information about the image. The photograph was taken 9/24/1894. The couple is wearing the costumes that they wore to a “Fancy dress ball” that was held on 9/20/1894. The gentleman is dressed as a Raja while the woman is dressed a a gypsy. She is holding a tambourine. This photograph was taken by a well know Indian studio. Theodore Julius Hoffmann and P. A. Johnston established a commercial photography studio in Calcutta (1882) and Darjeeling (1890). They also operated a studio in Simla. Johnston and Hoffmann’s photography business was the second largest commercial photography studio in India in that period. Many of their images were of North and Northeast India as well as Sikkim and Nepal. To view other photographs this pair of photographers, click on the category “Photographer: Johnston and Hoffmann”.  (SOLD)

MAN POSING FOR PHOTOGRAPHER IN CALCUTTA, INDIA

Calcutta, India is the location at which this cabinet card photograph was taken. The studio of Johnston and Hoffmann were the photographers. The reverse of the card has the stamp of Austrian lithographer, Bernard Wachtl of Vienna. Calcutta is the current capitol of the Indian state of West Bengal located in eastern India. However, at the time of this photograph and until 1911, during the British Raj (colonial rule), Calcutta was the capitol of India. It would be interesting to know why this gentleman was in India and something about his identity, but this information has been lost over time. Research reveals some information about the photographers. Theodore Julius Hoffmann and P. A. Johnston established a commercial photography studio in Calcutta (1882) and Darjeeling (1890). Their studio is considered to be the second largest commercial photography studio in India in that period. Many of their images were of North and Northeast India as well as Sikkim and Nepal. To view other cabinet cards from India, click on the category “India”. To view other works by Bernard Wachtl, click on the category “Lithographers: Bernard Wachtl”.