LACROSSE : NATIVE AMERICANS MAKING LACROSSE STICKS : VINTAGE POSTCARD : (1911)

This vintage lithographic postcard features a group of Native Americans sitting (one is standing) in front of a teepee and making lacrosse sticks. Sitting in the group is a cute dog. Native Americans are credited with the development of the game of lacrosse. More specifically, the Iroquois Nation were originators of the game. The Iroqouis were in upstate New York and North of the US border into Canada. Lacrosse became Canada’s national sport. The netting on the Native American made sticks was made with wattup (roots) or deer sinew (connective tissue from deer). This postcard is rich in color and represents both Iroquois history and the history of Lacrosse. This card was published by Nerlich & Company (Toronto, Canada). Another version of this postcard has a caption reporting that the cards scene is located on Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada. The postcard has a U.S. stamp and was mailed from Old Orchard Beach, Maine to Epping, New Hampshire in 1911.  (SOLD)

PORTRAIT OF A SHEEPISH WOMAN: FASHION STATEMENT IN GANANOQUE, CANADA

This vintage photograph captures a young woman dressed for winter in her lamb wool coat and lamb wool hat. Her left hand rests snugly in a muff. The photographer of this photograph is H. E. Paige who operated a studio in Gananoque, Ontario, Canada. This cabinet card portrait is in very good condition (see scans)

Buy this Vintage Cabinet Card (includes shipping within the US) #3361

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$35.50

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$44.50

Published in: on January 8, 2021 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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ALOOF WOMAN IN MARIEVILLE, QUEBEC, CANADA

 

A woman poses for her portrait at the studio of A. L. Bisaillon in Marieville, Quebec, Canada. She displays a look of disinterest. Her expression looks like it belongs on a modern day drivers license, a portrait that few people put much effort into their appearance. The subject of this photograph does seem to care about jewelry, and that is  reflected by the fact that she is wearing a great deal of it. She also is wearing a lace collar and black ribbon tie. Little information could be uncovered concerning Alphe-Leon Bisaillon, photographer of this image  (SOLD)

Published in: on November 15, 2020 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE ADVERTISING CALENDAR : A GIRL AND HER DOG : (1910)

This vintage advertising postcard was published for “The Prudential Insurance Company”. The firm’s home office was in Newark, New Jersey. The company started in Newark in 1875 and only had one product, burial insurance. It’s founder, John F. Dryden, became a US Senator. This postcard delivers the message that Prudential’s customers and non-customers were were eligible to receive, free-of-charge, 8″ x 10″ calendars for 1910. The illustration on the front of this postcard shows a little girl and her small dog. The child is blowing bubbles from a bowl of soapy water that sits between her and her dog. This postcard has a Canadian stamp and a 1909 postmark from Peterboro, Ontario, Canada. Peterboro is located 78 miles northeast of Toronto, and was once known as “The Electric City”, because it was the first town in Canada to utilize electric streetlights. The postcard was mailed on December 28th, just a few days before the New Year. This vintage postcard is in good condition (see scans). SOLD

Published in: on November 12, 2020 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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SWEET TEENAGE GIRL PEERS THROUGH AN OPEN WINDOW IN BROCKVILLE, ONTARIO, CANADA

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This cabinet card portrait features a girl peering out a large open window. She appears to be in her teenage years. The young lady is well dressed and well coiffed. She is wearing earrings, a collar pin, and a solemn expression. This photograph was taken at Murray’s studio, located in Brockville, Ontario, Canada. I located a blog, “The Brockville History Album” (Curated by Doug Grant) which may shed some light about the photographer. The site exhibits early photographs (circa 1880) of two of Brockville’s churches. The credited photographer was George B. Murray. At one point in time, George was partners with his son, Alex L. Murray. They operated a studio named “Murray & Son”. Alex was also known for being one of the founding members of the Brockville Cycling Club. A studio photo of Alex atop a high-wheel bicycle can be found on the afore mentioned Brockville history site. George Murray purchased the photo studio from A. C. McIntyre in 1869. He and his son were natives of Montreal. Alex, according to a business directory, was one of the most popular young men in Brockville. He was active in a number of athletic organizations. His involvement included participation in the town’s lacrosse, snow shoe, and toboggan clubs. Brockville is a city in Eastern Ontario. It is located in the Thousand Islands region. This cabinet card has excellent clarity and is in excellent condition (see scans).

Buy this Original Cabinet Card photograph (includes shipping within the US) #3148

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$25.00

Buy this original Cabinet Card Photograph (includes International shipping outside the US) #3148

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$33.50

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Published in: on August 8, 2020 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY OLDER WOMAN WRAPPED IN FURS

This vintage real photo postcard features an oval portrait of a pretty older woman wrapped in furs. She looks quite fashionable. She was living in an era when wearing furs was not politically incorrect. Her head covering is a very nice accessory. She looks great. The woman appears to be displaying a pursed lips smile. The postcard’s stamp box indicates that it was published sometime between 1924 and 1949. The woman’s photograph was taken by the Passport Studio in Toronto, Canada.This real photo postcard is in very good condition (see scans) .

Buy this original Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2781

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$13.50

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$22.00

 

Published in: on June 16, 2019 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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YOUNG MAN WEARING A FUR COAT AND FUR HAT IN SEAFORTH, ONTARIO

The young man in this photograph is well prepared for a cold Canadian winter. He is wearing a fur coat and fur hat. The photographer who took this portrait is William F. Tate who operated a studio in Seaforth, Ontario, Canada. This vintage photograph measures about 6″ x 4 1/4″.   SOLD

Published in: on August 5, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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THE MUSKEGON 6: A GROUP OF PRETTY YOUNG WOMAN POSE FOR THEIR PORTRAIT

Six young women gathered at the studio belonging to William McComb (1844-?) in order to have their photograph taken. The studio was located in Muskegon, Michigan. What is the connection between these women? The woman seated in the center front row of the photo has an open book on her lap. Perhaps the young ladies are students. More is known about the photographer than about the young women. William McComb grew up on Prince Edward Island, Canada. He was of Irish descent. By the time he was fifteen years old, McComb had developed an interest in photography. In 1859, he volunteered to become the assistant of a visiting photographer in the area. He learned the business and photography skills necessary to pursue the career of being a photographer. His career path took him to jobs in galleries in Ottawa and Montreal. He then moved to the United States where he met Muskegon photographer, J. D. Westervelt. The two men decided to work together, and the partnership lasted for just one year. In 1879, McComb opened his own photo studio. He soon became the most popular photographer in Muskegon. In 1895, a devastating fire destroyed his studio and it’s equipment as well as his collection of 40,000 negatives. McComb opened a new studio and rebuilt his business. Besides photography, he had a strong interest in weather forecasting and in 1893, he joined the US weather bureau. His duties included raising flags to notify mariners of approaching weather conditions. A photo of William McComb can be seen below. This cabinet card has gold beveled edges.   SOLD

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THREE PRETTY CANADIAN WOMEN WEARING KIMONOS IN CHATHAM, ONTARIO, CANADA

This vintage photograph features three women wearing pretty kimonos and flowers in their hair. Judging by their smiles, they seem to be having a good time as they pose for their portrait at the Butler Studio in Chatham, Ontario, Canada. There was a time when wearing this Japanese style clothing was quite popular in parts of the United States and Canada. This is apparent because it is not uncommon to find cabinet card era photographs with Western subjects wearing kimonos. In fact, you can view other photographs of Western women dressed in kimonos in the Cabinet Card Gallery’s collection. Place the word “kimono” in this blog’s search box to see other photos exemplifying this impact of Japanese fashion on American/Canadian fashion around the early twentieth century. The photographer of this image is J. S. Butler who operated as a photographer in Chatham from 1874 until 1902. A number of his photographs can be found in the collection of the Chatham-Kent Municipal Museum. A photo of Mr. Butler can be seen below.

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Published in: on April 8, 2018 at 3:03 pm  Comments (2)  
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ELDERLY WOMAN WEARING MOURNING DRESS IN EDMONTON, CANADA

This carte de visite portrait features an aged woman wearing mourning clothes. Her black dress, black hat, and sad expression, all suggest that she has suffered a recent loss. Her left hand is placed on a book atop a small table. The book is likely a bible. The photographer of this cdv photograph is J. R. Bentley. He operated a studio in Edmonton, Canada. Research found an ad in “The Photographic News” (1893) in which Bentley advertises the sale of his studio. It is very interesting to note that the advertising on the reverse of this CDV refers to Bentley as a “Portrait, Landscape, & Equestrian Photographer”. I do not remember ever seeing a early photographer refer to himself as a “Equestrian” photographer. I wonder if Mr. Bentley took photos of individual horses, or if he photographed individuals sitting on horses. I hope someday I locate one of Bentley’s equestrian photographs.

Published in: on April 6, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Comments (3)  
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