MISS GRACE CHALMERS – HER TALENT PROVES THAT GREAT “ACTRESSES ARE BORN AND NOT MADE”

mess chalmers

mess chalmers 1 This vintage real photo postcard features stage actress Grace Chalmers. Her portrait can be found at Britain’s National Portrait Gallery. Research reveals that Miss Chalmers received acclaim for her role as “Glory Quayle” in “The Christian”. A photo of Grace Chalmers, with a brief caption, appears in the “Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News (1908). She is reviewed in the magazine, “Navy and Army Illustrated” (1905). The reviewer must have been impressed with her acting. He points out that Miss Chalmers has “wonderful histrionic abilities” despite her lack of theatrical training and theatrical genes. According to the writer, Chalmers talent roves that “actresses are born and not made”. This vintage postcard was published by J. Beagles of London, England. It is part of a series (no. 289D). Miss Chalmers portrait was photographed by Denton & Co.. This postcard is in excellent condition (see scans).

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2729

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$13.50

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes International shipping outside the US) #2729

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$21.50

 

 

 

 

 

 

mess chalmers 2

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PORTRAITS OF EVELYN MILLARD: SHAKESPEARIAN STAGE ACTRESS (VINTAGE RPPC)

POSTCARD 1  (SOLD)

millard 2

POSTCARD 2  (SOLD)

millard

POSTCARD 3  (SOLD)

MILLARD 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                               POSTCARD 4  #2466

                                                         The top vintage real photo postcard (#1) features  a portrait of English stage actress Evelyn Millard (1869-1941). She was well known for her acting in Shakespearian theater as well as for her beauty. She is also noted for creating the role of Cecily Cardewin in the premier of Oscar Wildes play “The Importance of Being Earnest” (1895). This postcard was produced by the Rotary Photo Company of London, England.

    The second postcard is a portrait of Miss Millard taken by the Davidson Brothers studio in London, England. The postcard is part of a series (“Real Photographic Series” no. 2195). Davidson Brothers was located in both London and New York City. The firm operated between 1901 and 1911. Some of their theatrical postcard portraits have the same format as many of the Rotograph photo cards.  This postcard was postmarked in South Lambeth in 1907. Lambeth is a district in Central London. The writer of the message on this postcard starts the communication with “Dear Lizzie, I think this is one of your favorites”. Most likely the writer was stating that Evelyn Millard was one of the favorite actresses of the recipient of the postcard. Collecting postcard images of theatrical stars was certainly quite popular at the time this postcard was written.

The third postcard is color tinted and was produced by the Rotary Postcard Co. as part of the Rotary Photographic Series ( no. 191G). The photographer was T. C. Turner who operated studios in London and Hull, England. Thomas Charles Turner (1839-1896) operated his London studio between 1870 and 1900. Millard is clearly in costume for this portrait. Note her unusual pin. It looks like a multi-eyed horror movie insect. This vintage postcard is in very good condition (see scans).

Postcard number four is rare. Miss Millard looks quite beautiful and is dressed in an exquisite gown. Note, that unlike most of her other portrait postcards, Evelyn has blonde hair. Most of her photo postcards show her with dark hair. It is very possible, even likely, that she is wearing a wig in this portrait. The photographer of this image was the Lafayette studio. The firm was founded in Dublin in 1880 by James Stack Lauder. His father, Edmund Lauder was a pioneering and successful photographer. The elder Lauder used the name “Lafayette’ to give the company a touch of Paris, which was a a city considered the center of the art and photography world. James was joined in business by his three photographer brothers. By the 1900, the company had studios in Glasgow, Manchester, London and Belfast. The studio also was invited to photograph Queen Victoria. The company still exists today. This postcard was published by J. Beagles & Co. of London, England. The postcard is part of a series (no. G 511.P). The “G” is an abbreviation for “glossy”. There was also a matte version of this postcard portrait. John Beagles (1844-1909) was born in England. At age 17 he was a “pupil teacher”. In the census of 1891, he is listed as a “photographic publisher” in Nottingham. Later he established J. Beagles & Co. in London. He and his successors produced a variety of postcards including an extensive catalog of celebrity (stage and screen) portrait postcards. The firm also published topographic and view cards, as well as a series called “Matrimonial Cats”. After Beagle’s death, the business continued as J. Beagles & Co. until it closed in 1939. This postcard has great clarity and is in excellent condition.                                     

MILLARD 4

    POSTCARD 4         

 

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2466

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$27.50

 

 

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes International shipping outside the US) #2466

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$35.50

 

                                                                   POSTCARD  1

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                                                                       POSTCARD 2

millard3                                                                   POSTCARD 3

                                                                                                MILLARD 4 2        POSTCARD 4