ONE OF “THE BOYS IN THE BAND” IN SHELBYVILLE, ILLINOIS

trombone

trombone 1

The gentleman featured in this cabinet card is clearly a member of a band. He is wearing a band uniform and holding his trombone. Note his cap and bow tie. The studio which produced this image was Babb’s Ground Floor Gallery in Shelbyville, Illinois. James A. Babb (1855-?) and Jacob P. Babb (1857-1908) were the proprietors of Babb’s photographic studio. James was a native of Missouri and worked on a farm until 1879  when he came to Sullivan, Illinois and worked in a photographic gallery. He then returned to Missouri (Jefferson City) and worked for a photographer named S. Winans. He then moved to Shelbyville where he worked several years in the grocery business until he and his brother Jacob, established a Photography business. James Babb married Miss Mollie E. Oliver of Shelbyville. Jacob Babb was also a Missouri native and started his work life as a farmer. At age twenty-four he began working in the lumber industry and in 1883 he began a career in photography with the same S. Winans previously mentioned. His next job change occurred when he partnered with his brother in the Shelbyville gallery. In 1887 Jacob married Miss Anna Sampson of Shelbyville.  The major source of information concerning the Babb brothers was the “Illinois Genealogy Trails” section on Shelby County. This cabinet card portrait is in good condition (see scans).

Buy this original Cabinet Card Photograph (includes shipping within the US) #2749

To purchase this item, click on the Pay with PayPal button below

$38.50

Buy this original Cabinet Card Photograph (includes International shipping outside the US) 2749

To purchase this item, click on the Pay with PayPal button below

$46.50

trombone 2

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Published in: on May 21, 2019 at 12:01 pm  Comments (4)  
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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. A colorized version:

    http://goo.gl/Ee0pxA

  2. I don’t know what kind of weird hybrid instrument that is but it isn’t a trombone. This is one for the music historians.


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