ZOE TUTTLE: PRETTY STAGE ACTRESS

zoe tuttle_0001The Boston Globe of 1880 in a play review of Uncle Toms Cabin, writes that Little Miss Zoe Tuttle played Eva in a “perfect” performance. Ms Tuttle appears to have begun as a child actress but little more information has been discovered. Additional research will be done and any facts concerning Ms Tuttle or additional comments from blog visitors would be appreciated. The photographer of this cabinet card is Myers of New York City.  This photograph is back stamped with the name of Charles Ritzmann, a well known purveyor of photographs of stage actors and actresses.

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://cabinetcardgallery.com/2009/11/14/zoe-tuttle-pretty-stage-actress/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

3 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. This is remarkable that the actress shares my name and the picture was posted on my birthday – 14th Nov! Could she be related??

  2. I have a photo of Zoe Tuttle in our family photo album dated about 1885 taken by Bradley and Rulofso Montgomery Street,San Francisco.
    The family were and still are in Australia. I always wondered who she was.

  3. The Descendants of William & Elizabeth Tuttle by George Frederick Tuttle, printed & published by Tuttle & Co., Rutland, VT, 1883:
    p. 489-490
    “WILLIAM HENRY TUTTLE, born in Newburgh (Cuyahoga County), Ohio, Nov. 12, 1837. At the age of 19, spring of 1856, went west, entered the service of the American Fur Company, headquarters about the mouth of the Yellowstone River, 1,500 miles from white settlements. Soon learned the languages of the different tribes and was appointed the first Indian agent for the Sioux nation. The Indians constantly at war, his partner murdered and several attempts upon his own life induced him to resign. He then started for the Nevada mines, upon reaching which the Rebellion broke out and he enlisted as a private in the 2nd Regt. Cal. Vols.; serving through all the intermediate grades he became Acting Asst. Adj. Gen. with the rank of Major. His experience as a fronteresman becoming known to the old army officers, he was thenceforth employed until the end of the war against the Indians on the plains and in Texas, Arizona, Washington Ter., Oregon and Nevada. He then went to Mexico and ws appointed Col. in the Mexican army under Gen. Vega; but a short experience in that service sufficed to make evident the superior attractions of private American citizenship. Now (1878) resides in San Francisco, Cal.; married there Aug. 22, 1868, ALICE E. CHENEY, born in Indiana Jan. 27, 1852; only child ZOE LOLIE TUTTLE, born San Jose, Cal., March 18, 1870; made her first appearance on the theatrical stage at San Francisco Aug. 5, 1875, in her 6th year, and at this time, 1878, is a popular favorite there, playing leading parts in “All for Gold” and other pieces. The San Francisco Post, weekly and daily, of Aug. 15, 1878 says: “Little ZOE TUTTLE, the pretty and piquant little girl whose precocious talent is so familiar to our theatre goers, goes east in charge of her mother to star in “All for Gold” and other pieces. The qualities which have made her so much of a favorite here will doubtless secure her future success.” The Chicago Tribune of Nov. 16, 1879, says: “ZOE TUTTLE the ‘Little Buttercup’ of Haverly’s Juvenile Pinafore company was last night presented with a gold medal, a tribute tendered her by professional admirers of her rendition of the character. The medal is very beautiful and has the following inscription: ‘To the best Little Buttercup from her professional admirers, Chicago, Nov. 15, 1879.’ In the centre is a raised design of a buttercup.” During the winter of 1880 she played ‘Eva’ in ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ at Booth’s Theatre, N. Y. C., Garrett & Palmer, lessees. The play had a run of several weeks.”


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: