PORTRAIT OF THE MOST ADORABLE SIX YEAR OLD LITTLE GIRL YOU’VE EVER SEEN (1924)

This vintage real photo postcard features a portrait of one of the most adorable little girls that I haver seen. The reverse of the postcard indicates that this photograph was taken in 1924 and the young lady in the image is six years old. Whoever dressed this child for her day at the photo studio, had a keen fashion sense. In addition the child’s facial expression is charming and priceless. The little girl appears as if she is preparing to go for a walk on a rainy or rain threatening day. The unidentified photographer was gifted. I wish I could see more of his/her photographs. The locale of the photo studio is also unknown. It is possible that this photograph was taken in Canton, Ohio; since that city is listed as the home of the intended receiver of this postcard. This photo postcard has excellent clarity and measures about 3 3/8″ x 5 1/4″. This unique and magical postcard is in very good condition (see scans).

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #2579

To purchase this item, click on the Pay with PayPal button below

$53.50

Buy this original Real Photo Postcard (includes International shipping outside the US) #2579

To purchase this item, click on the Pay with PayPal button below

$61.50

 

 

 

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Published in: on November 2, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A HANDSOME COUPLE: JOE AND ANNE SCHWEITZER IN CANTON, OHIO

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Jacob S. Wissler operated a “Photographic Art Studio” at 129 Walnut Street in Canton, Ohio. According to an inscription on the reverse of this image, in 1889, “Joe and Aunt Ann Schweitzer” visited the studio to obtain a portrait. The result of their photographic venture is seen above. The Schweitzer’s appear in the 1920 and 1930 US census. Joe was born in 1876 in Ohio and he and his wife (listed as Anna M. Schweitzer) were living in Canton with their twenty year-old daughter (Leona M.). Joe’s parents were both born in Germany. In the 1920 census, Joe was working as a machine operator for a Roller Bearing company. Just ten years later, in 1930, Joe was both widowed and unemployed.

PRETTY YOUNG WOMAN SITTING ON PRETTY UNUSUAL CHAIR IN CANTON, OHIO

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A pretty young woman appears to be comfortable enough as she sits on an unusual chair and poses for her  portrait at the Manly & Son studio in Canton, Ohio. She is holding a small fan and displays a faint smile as she leans toward the camera. She is wearing a ruffled dress with a striped collar and is also wearing a pin. Note the fringed chair and also notice the floor lamp. At least it appears to be a floor lamp. Could it possibly be an odd looking table? The woman is wearing a hat, but due to her puffy curly hair, the hat appears to be floating on her head. Research provided some information concerning photographer George Watson Manly but the more interesting story concerns his wife Angeline Stewart Manly. George was born in New York in about 1824. George appears to have begun his photography career in Akron, Ohio. He started out as a dagguerreotypist beginning 1859. The 1870 US census confirms that George was working as a photographer in Akron and that he was married to Angeline who was seven years his junior. The couple had three children in the household; Sabray (age 24), William (age 18), and Clifford (age 10).The boys were presumably George and Angeline’s sons. Also in the household was a young relative of Angeline and a young Irish couple. The husband of the Irish couple was listed as a photographer and he was likely an assistant to George. One source asserts that George stayed in Akron until 1873, and during some of his time in Akron he also had a studio in Salem, Ohio. It is not clear when he moved to Canton, but he is listed in Canton business directories by at least 1881. So what is the story concerning George’s wife, Angeline? The story is that Angeline Stewart Manly was a major figure in the temperance crusade in both the city of Akron and in the state of Ohio. She served as Akron’s city representative to the first state convention. The convention organized the Women’s Temperance League of Ohio and Manly was elected President. In 1883, Manly published a novel called “Hit and Miss: A Story of Real Life”. It is not known why George and Angeline moved to Canton from Akron. George died in Canton in 1900 and Angeline died there in 1913.

Published in: on December 3, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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PORTRAIT OF A BUCKEYE: CADDIE JOHNSON POSES IN CANTON, OHIO

This cabinet card portrait features Caddie Johnson in a very fine dress. She is posing for the photographer at the Buckeye Portrait & View Company  at No. 13 North Walnut Street in Canton, Ohio. No further information could be found about Ms. Johnson or the Buckeye Portrait and View Company. However, an explanation of the term “Buckeye” was excavated. The Buckeye is the state tree of Ohio.

A VERY STERN LOOKING YOUNG BOY FROM CANTON, OHIO

This cabinet card features a young boy who is very fashionably dressed and is carrying a walking stick. Note his cap, large bow, and pocket handkerchief. Also look at his short suit. His very stern look and his outfit makes him look much older than his actual age. The photographer of this image is F. A. Jewell of Canton, Ohio. He was active in Canton during the early 1890’s. He specialized in portraits and photographs of large family groups.

Published in: on June 5, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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NAVAL OFFICER IN SHANGHAI (PHOTOGRAPHED BY AH FONG)

A naval officer, wearing his dress white uniform, poses for his portrait at the studio of Ah Fong. Fong had photographic studios in both Shanghai and Wei-Hai-Wei. Ah Fong was active in photography in the 1860’s through the 1880’s and beyond. In 1937, he published a photo album entitled “The Sino-Japanese Hostilities”. Fong was a Chinese photographer trained by western photographer around Canton. He later opened his own studio  and it operrated through World War II. His photographs of Nanjing in 1937 documented for the West the “Rape of Nanking” and Japanese denials were shown to be lies. The dates cited in this description come from research and some of them are likely inaccurate unless Fong lived an extremely long life. In regard to the pictured officer, no identifying information of the officer is available but perhaps a visitor to the site will recognize his uniform and leave a comment.