PORTRAIT OF HOWARD BRISCOE : RAILROAD CARPENTER : BARABOO, WISCONSIN

The handsome young man in this photograph is named Howard Briscoe. His name is inscribed on the reverse of this cabinet card photo. Briscoe lived in Baraboo, Wisconsin. He lived there all, or most of his life. Briscoe was born in 1878. His father was a miller by trade, Briscoe’s wife was named Julia Simon Briscoe. Howard Briscoe worked as a carpenter for a railroad company. The photographer of this image, Mr. Mould, is mentioned in a number of photographic journals. He placed an ad for his studio in a book about Sauk County, Wisconsin (1891). The Photographic Times (1898) reports on his appointment to a lobbying committee of the Photographers Association of Wisconsin. The Encyclopedia Dubuque (1911) reveals that Sim Mould operated a photographic studio at 107 Main Street in Dubuque, Iowa. The cabinet card gallery has other photographs by Mould, Place his name in the search box to view these other images. The town of Baraboo is situated on the Baraboo river. The town was settled by Abe Wood and originally called Adams. In 1852 it was renamed Baraboo. In the town’s early history it became the home of several sawmills. In the nineteenth century the town served as the headquarters of several circuses, including Ringling Brothers. Baraboo became known as “Circus City”. This cabinet card photo is in excellent condition (see scans).

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Published in: on February 8, 2020 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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LITTLE GIRL IN A FIELD OF DAISIES IN BARABOO,WISCONSIN

 

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baraboo 1A cute little girl with curly hair poses in a studio created field of daisies for photographer Sim Mould. The studio was located in Baraboo, Wisconsin. The girl is wearing a dress wth a lace collar and has a flower pinned to the front of her dress. An inscription on the reverse of the cabinet card indicates that the child’s name is Hattie Acot. Unfortunately, no biographical information could be found about her. The photographer, Mr. Mould is mentioned in a number of photographic journals. He placed an ad for his studio in a book about Sauk County, Wisconsin (1891). The Photographic Times (1898) reports on his appointment to a lobbying committee of the Photographers Association of Wisconsin. The Encyclopedia Dubuque (1911) reveals that Sim Mould operated a photographic studio at 107 Main Street in Dubuque, Iowa. The town of Baraboo is situated on the Baraboo river. The town was settled by Abe Wood and originally called Adams. In 1852 it was renamed Baraboo. In the town’s early history it became the home of several sawmills. In the nineteenth century the town served as the headquarters of several circuses, including Ringling Brothers. Baraboo became known as “Circus City”.  This cabinet card portrait is in very good condition (see scans).

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$43.50

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baraboo 2

FASHIONABLE YOUNG COUPLE IN PARKERSBURG, IOWA

PARKERSBURG COUPLE_0004A young fashionably dressed couple pose for their portrait at the Byerly studio in Parkersburg, Iowa. The young man is holding a rolled up magazine or newspaper. The young woman is wearing a large ribbon. It looks like a ribbon that one might be awarded as a prize. The photographer, Orison Byerly (1836-?), operated a studio in Parkersburg in the 1880’s and 1890’s. He was born in Ohio and learned photography as a young man in Dubuque, Iowa under the tutelage of Frank Pickerel.

Published in: on March 30, 2013 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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A PROFESSIONAL LOOKING GENTLEMAN IN BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK

The man in this cabinet card photograph appears to be a professional gentleman. He is wearing an overcoat and a nicely trimmed beard. He is standing next to his derby hat and has a pocket watch. Perhaps the well dressed gentleman is an attorney. Maybe its not a coincidence that the Binghamton, New York based photographer, Singhi, was located on Court Street. The reverse of the photograph has an inscription which identifies the gentleman as “Adelbert Harroun”. Research reveals that Mr. Harroun was not a lawyer but instead, he was an accountant. The 1870 census notes that Thomas Adelbert Harroun (1851-?) was the 19 year-old son of  Thomas Harroun (1824-1907) and Salina King Harroun (1824-1903). His father’s occupation was listed as a “Presiding Elder”  and further research found that he was a Methodist clergyman. His mother was a homemaker. Adelbert lived with his parents and two siblings in Norwich, New York. Sister Flora (age 22) was a music teacher and brother Arthur (age 11) was a student. He married his wife, Mary Winton, in 1888. The couple had two children. The 1900 census finds the 47 year old Harroun living in Dunleith, Illinois. He was living with his wife, Mary, their son N. Winton (age 10), and daughter Anna Augusta (age 9). Harroun was working as a railroad yard clerk. Further investigation revealed that daughter Anna Augusta died in 1904 in Dubuque, Illinois. The 1920 census reports that the 67 year-old Harroun was widowed and living in Waukegan Lake, Illinois with his sister Flora. He was working as an accountant. The 1930 census locates Harroun in Prineville, Oregon and living as a boarder. At 79 years of his age, he was still working (bookkeeper). The photographer of this image is Will G. Singhi. He worked in Binghamton, New York between 1872 and 1886. His albumen print “A Winter Scene” is exhibited in the online “American Museum of Photography”. Singhi had taken a photograph that appeared to capture a snowball in mid flight heading toward a newsboy who was prepared to deflect it. The museum also has on display a funny cartoon self portrait caricature that Singhi used as an advertisement. The Photographic Times and American Photographer (1883) comments on Singhi’s wonderful sense of humor.