LILLIAN GRUBB: STAGE ACTRESS DUPED BY BIGAMIST HUSBAND

 

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This cabinet card features pretty actress/singer, Lillian Grubb. The New York Times (1884) reported that the young Baltimore actress had applied to a local court to have her marriage annulled from George Steitmatter, alias, George Deberhard. She wanted her marriage declared null and void due to her husband’s misrepresentation about his marital and financial status. He claimed to be single and wealthy. While still Grubb’s fiance, Mr. Steitmatter claimed that the couple needed to marry quickly because he was about to embark on a trip to Germany. When Ms. Grubb agreed to tie the knot (sometime in 1883) , Steitmatter supposedly left for Germany. In reality, he had gone to New York, the home of his lawful wife. When Ms. Grubb learned that her new husband was already married and was actually in New York; she took the reported legal action. The top cabinet card was published by Newsboy as part of a series of actress photographs (#87). These photographs were used by the company as premiums for their tobacco products. The second cabinet card is a portrait produced by celebrity photographer Jose Mora. She is quite beautiful and appears very coy in this somewhat provocative photograph. Below is an example of one of the many cigarette cards that featured Miss Grubb. This premium was produced by Duke (#N140) as part of their “Yacht Club Colors Series” and was published in 1890.

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Published in: on July 5, 2014 at 12:01 pm  Comments (1)  
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A MAN AND HIS CHOPS IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

SIDEBURNS BALTIMORE_0001Meet Philip August Albrecht. His name is written in pencil on the reverse of this photograph. Mr Albrecht has chops. This image may be faded but it certainly does justice to his mutton chops. See more great facial hair in the categories “Beards (Only the Best)” and “Mustaches (Only the Best)”. Philip Albrecht appears in the 1870 US census. The document reveals that he was born in Prussia around 1843. He was employed as a bookkeeper and married to Anna Albrecht. The couple had two children, Emma (age 3) and John (age 10 months). Baltimore City Directories disclose that Philip Albrecht worked as a bookkeeper between at least 1868 and 1882. He worked as a cashier at least between 1888 and 1898. Albrecht died in 1909. This photograph was produced by William Foss Shorey (1833-1911) whose studio was located in Baltimore, Maryland. He was a well known photographer in Baltimore and operated there for more than forty years. He was born in Maine and the son of a furrier (Nehemiah Shorey). William graduated from the Maryland Institute of Art and Design and became a drawing instructor there at twenty-five years of age. He learned photography under the tutelage of H. E. Woodward who was associated with the Institute but also owned the Monumental Art Studio. Shorey’s obituary states that he was the official photographer of William “Buffalo Bill” Cody for the first ten years of his show business career. It was also reported that Shorey was the official photographer of the Maryland Department of the Grand Army of the Republic. He is buried in the Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore.

PORTRAIT OF A TIRED OLD MAN IN TEXAS (PHOTOGRAPH BY CAPTAIN HARVEY ROBERTS MARKS)

This image captures the portrait of a tired looking old man. This gentleman appears to have had better days. He looks exhausted and troubled. This photograph was taken by the Mark’s studio in Austin, Texas. The photographer of this cabinet card lived an interesting life and he was both a pioneer of Texas and a pioneer of photography. Harvey Roberts Marks (1821-1902) was a well known photographer who worked in a number of locations. He was active in Baltimore, Maryland (1849-1853), San Francisco, California (1851), Mobile, Alabama  (1856-1859), Houston, Texas (1865-1870), and Austin, Texas (1870-1902). He was born in New York City. He first arrived in Texas in 1838 and received a very large land grant in Harris County (Houston). He enlisted in a company of Texas Rangers in 1840 and reached the rank of Captain. He was married to Emily H. Bassan in 1849. Research indicates that she was  member of one of the most prominent families in Baltimore. In 1849 he was Jacob Shew’s partner in the Shew and Mark’s Gallery in Baltimore. He continued the gallery alone when Shew left Baltimore until 1851. The 1850 census revealed that he had three assistants in the gallery and took 5,000 daguerreotypes annually. In 1851 he took photographs of castaways from a Japanese ship involved in an incident that caught national attention. Mark’s moved to Austin in 1870 and opened a gallery a year later. During that time he became Vice President of the National Photographic Association. Marks served during the civil war. He was a member of the Houston Battalion, Texas Infantry (Detailed Men). Research was unsuccessful in gathering this Confederate regiment’s history. Marks entered the regiment and left the regiment as a Captain.  Interestingly, when former Confederacy President, Jefferson Davis, visited Austin in 1875, he sat in Mark’s studio for his portrait. He died at the age of 81.

ADORABLE BABY IN A WASHBOWL IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

A very cute baby poses for a photographer, artistically placed in a washbowl. The baby appears inquisitive about the proceedings. Bachrach & Bro. is the studio that produced this portrait. The gallery was located in Baltimore, Maryland. Kudos for the photographer for this creative close-up image. The Bachrach studio was nationally known and is still known today. David Bachrach (1845-1921) was an American commercial photographer based in Baltimore. He made significant contributions in technical, artistic and professional advancements in the field of photography. He was a national spokesperson for photographers and published many articles and photographs in photography journals. He experimented with self toning papers and developed the first practical process of photographic printing on canvas, a precursor to photo engraving. Bachrach Inc., founded in 1910, is still headed by the Bachrach family. The company owned studios in all major east coast cities. One of Bachrach’s earliest photographs was taken on assignment to cover the dedication of the Soldiers National Cemetery at Gettysburg in 1863. He photographed President Lincoln delivering what would become, a very famous speech. Bachrach’s home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. He once shared the home with a celebrated relative, Gertrude Stein. Among his famous portraits are images of Ulysses Grant, Theodore Roosevelt,Mark Twain, and Alexander Graham Bell. Bachrach’s business was truly a family business. Among the relatives who were involved  in the business was a brother,  a son, and two grandsons.