HANDSOME DEVIL IN ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

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A handsome well dressed and devilish looking man poses for his portrait at Lindenmuth’s studio which was located at 24 North 6th Street in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He looks terrific in his three piece suit and his well groomed beard and handlebar mustache. Writing on the reverse of the photograph dates the image as being produced in 1899. The photographer of this portrait is primarily known for his work as an artist. Arlington Nelson Lindenmuth (1856-1950) was an American landscape and portrait painter who lived and painted in Allentown and the Lehigh Valley region of Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania native was a member of the “Baum Circle”., the group of artists either were taught by or influenced by Pennsylvania impressionist painter, Walter Emerson Baum. Lindenmuth was also one of the earliest professional photographers in the Lehigh Valley area. He opened his first studio in Allentown in 1881. Prior to that, he operated studios in  Tamaqua, Philadelphia, and Pottstown. All three cities are in Pennsylvania. As early as 1862, Lindenmuth was also employed as a traveling sales representative for Eastman Kodak. To view other photographs by Lindenmuth, click on the category “Photographer: Lindenmuth”.

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A MAN AND HIS WALRUS MUSTACHE IN CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA

WALRUS_0005The Proctor studio produced this cabinet card portrait of a man with a walrus mustache. This admirable facial hair places this image in the category “Mustaches (Only the Best”). Click on the category to view an array of notable mustaches. A. T. Proctor’s studio was located on Capitol Street in Charleston, West Virginia. He was the successor to the Becker & Fell studio. Alfred Tobert Proctor was born in 1864 in Catalpa, Virginia.  Sometime about 1888 he began his photography career in Charleston. He originally partnered with Elmer B. Tully (Proctor & Tully). In 1894 they moved their business to Huntington, West Virginia leaving photographer William Erskine to run the Charleston studio. In 1897 Erskine joined the two partners in Huntington. Ultimately the partnership ended and the three photographers operated independent businesses. Proctor was very active in the photography community. He served as President of the American Photographers Association for several years beginning in 1910. He competed in many exhibitions and Eastman Kodak used his portrait in its national advertising. He died of a heart attack in 1933. Much of his work now resides in the special collections library at Marshall University.