FOREVER PLAID: CABINET CARD PORTRAIT OF A NEW ENGLAND GENTLEMAN

This cabinet card features a handsome middle aged man wearing a plaid vest and jacket. He has a longish but styled beard and he has piercing eyes. This gentleman was photographed by the Dunklee & Bau studio. The photographers operated studios in Northampton and Greenfield (Massachusetts as well as in Brattleboro, Vermont. Note the reverse of this cabinet card; it is quite ornate. The reverse of the photograph advertises that the photographers had won an award at a  1890 exhibition. Therefore we know that this photograph was taken during 1890 or later. Charles Dunklee was born in Rockingham, Vermont in 1842. He served four years in Company I of the 4th Vermont Infantry during the civil war. He entered the war as a private and mustered out as a private. He was the Vice President of his regiments veteran group according to an 1887 news article. In 1865 he married May C. Billings and they were married 54 years until her death. Dunklee’s 90th birthday was marked in the Lewiston Daily Sun (1932). This cabinet card was produced by Dunklee while in partnership with Charles Bau. The Bulletin of Photography (1914) notes that Bau sold his studio in Brattleboro, Vermont in order to return to Greenfield to open a new photographic gallery. To see other images by Dunklee and Bau, click on the category “Photographer: Dunklee”.

A BEARDED GENTLEMAN IN GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS

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This cabinet card portrait features a bearded gentleman posing at the Dunklee and Bau studio in Greenfield, Massachusetts. The man has a long wiry beard and an intense expression. Advertising on the reverse of the cabinet card states that the Dunklee & Bau studio had won medals at a 1890 Greenfield exhibition. Charles Dunklee was born in Rockingham, Vermont in 1842. He served four years in Company I of the 4th Vermont Infantry during the civil war. He entered as a private and was mustered out as a private. He was the Vice President of his regiments veteran group according to an 1887 news article. In 1865 he married May C. Billings and they were married 54 years until her death. Dunklee’s 90th birthday was marked in the Lewiston Daily Sun (1932). The article notes that he had photographic studios in Greenfield and Northfield, Mass. as well as Brattleboro, Vermont. This cabinet card was produced by Dunklee while in partnership with Charles Bau. The Bulletin of Photography (1914) notes that Bau had sold his studio in Brattleboro, Vermont in order to return to Greenfield to open a new photographic gallery. The article points out that Bau had left Greenfield just twelve years before. The aforementioned history tells us that this photograph was taken after 1890 and before 1902.

AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN IN ST. JOHNSBURY, VERMONT

VERMONT MILITIAAccording to the previous owner of this photograph, the military officer pictured is a member of the St. Johnsbury Guard which was part of the 1st Vermont Infantry. The medal on his chest reveals that he is a 5 year veteran. The photographer of this image is Olin W. Chase who had studios at various times during his career at 32 Main Street and 47 Main Street in St. Johnsbury. The 1896  St. Johnsbury business directory reports that he was married to Mary J. Chase. He is listed in the 1901 directory as being in business in St. Johnsbury but the 1904 directory indicates that Chase had relocated to Greenfield, Massachusetts.

Published in: on June 20, 2013 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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EVA McGINLEY: CHARACTER CHANGE ARTIST

mcginley_0004This composite cabinet card features Eva McGinley and is subtitled indicating that she was  a “character change artist”. The central portrait on the card shows a prim and proper lady but the image is surrounded by other images displaying Miss McGinley’s versatility and talent to play disparate character roles. Eva McGinley was not a major actress which is apparent by the dearth of information readily available in my preliminary research. However, two newspaper articles were found pertaining to Miss McGinley.  The New York Dramatic Mirror (1900) reported that “Eva McGinley’s voice failed her at Greenfield, Iowa last week” and she and her husband Bob went to Omaha to recuperate. A second article appeared in the New York National Police Gazette (1900) which proclaimed that Miss McGinley and her husband were enjoying themselves in Lakeview, Iowa and that she had shot and killed the largest pelican ever killed on Wall Lake. Imagining Miss Mcginley hunting pelicans with a rifle is distasteful to me but it certainly indicates that she really was quite a “character”. The photographer of this image is unidentified.

LITTLE EDDIE

Who is Little Eddie? “Little Eddie” is the subject of this cabinet card photograph but research yielded no information about him. In this image, long haired Little Eddie is wearing a top coat and top hat. He is also wearing a lace collar with a triangular bib. He has a flower pinned to his lapel and a white handkerchief in his breast pocket. He is holding a wand type stick. The object has a small handle. The boy in this picture has a look of a showman. Perhaps he wasn’t even a boy but instead an adult midget (the term “little person” was not yet used).  The photographer of this image was Edward A. Remington who was a native of Greenfield, Massachusetts and came to Buffalo, New York from Chicago, Illinois. Remington’s obituary appears in The Professional and Amateur Photographer (1909). The article states that he was a “widely known” photographer in Buffalo for 15 years. He left behind a widow, Mrs. Mamie Remington.

Published in: on April 12, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (3)  
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