THE HAPPIEST BOY IN PORTLAND, MAINE

The little boy featured in this carte de visite may be the happiest child in Portland, Maine. He has the most wonderful smile and even his eyes sparkle with joy. He is wearing a sailor suit, which was a popular style during the cdv and cabinet card era. This photograph was taken at the J. H. Lamson gallery in Portland, Maine. The Cabinet Card Gallery has other photographs by Mr. Lamson and they can be seen by clicking on the category “Photographer: Lamson”. Joseph Harrison Lamson (1840-1901) operated a studio in Portland, Maine. His father was a maker of daguerrotypes and his mother was an artist. He began his career in photography in Bangor, Maine and then worked in Cuba, the West Indies, and South America. He made a fortune and then bought a studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then moved to Maine and and began his photographic studio in Portland. He photographed the poets Longfellow and Whittier. When he died, his two sons took over the studio.

Published in: on February 16, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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HANDSOME AND WELL DRESSED YOUNG GENTLEMAN IN BANGOR, MAINE

HANDSOME BANGORChalmers studio in Bangor, Maine produced this photograph of a formally dressed and handsome young man. The reverse of the photograph has the subject’s name and a few more details listed.  The fellows name is C. L. (possibly G. L.) Surall of the University of Maine, class of 1899.  This image is likely a graduation picture.

Published in: on July 13, 2013 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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HANDSOME YOUNG MAN IN BANGOR, MAINE (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

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A handsome young man preens for the camera at the Ramsdell & Halloran studio in Bangor, Maine. Writing on the reverse of the photograph is not totally legible but appears to state “Board of Editors” and “Kallour” or Kallow”. Despite the written clues on the reverse of the photograph, research did not uncover any information pertaining to this gentleman’s identity. Investigating did reveal that one of the photographers of this image was female. Miss Emily I Ramsdell (1856-1917) appears in the 1880 census as living with her parents in Atkinson, Maine and working as a school teacher. Examining several Bangor city directories reveals that she was employed as a photographer as early as 1892 and as late as 1914. The 1887 through 1899 directories show that she was partnered with Thomas F. Halloran. The Bulletin of Photography (1917) reports her death at age sixty-one.

A MAN WITH AN IMPRESSIVE MUSTACHE IN BANGOR, MAINE (1898)

This photographic portrait captures a good looking and well dressed gentleman posing at the J. F. Gerrity Company studio in Bangor, Maine. The gentleman in this photograph has a wonderful well groomed mustache and is wearing what appears to be a pin back button on his lapel. There is a design on the button that I can not identify. The reverse of the photograph has an inscription that is dated 1898. The subject is identified as Harry H McLean. The message states “Merry Xmas, Happy New Year” and the word “University” followed by an unidentified word. An advertisement in a Bangor Board of Trade publication (1899) indicates that the Gerrity studio had two locations; 11 State Street in Bangor, and 244 Miiddle Street in Portland, Maine. City of Bangor directories indicate that he also owned a lumber business in Bangor. Census data reveals that Gerrity was born in 1855 and had at least two wives; Nancy (1920 census) and Edith (1930 census). No biographical information about Harry McLean was found.

Published in: on October 4, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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DREAMY EYED LITTLE GIRL WITH LOTS OF HAIR IN BANGOR, MICHIGAN

“Gimme head with hair. Long beautiful hair. Shining, gleaming streaming flaxen, waxen. Give me down to there hair. Shoulder length or longer.” The photograph reminds one of the lyrics of the song “Hair” which was performed in the play of the same name.  It seems likely that the adorable little girl in this cabinet card photograph, heard many comments about her beautiful hair. She is wearing a pretty dress and is holding a copy of Wilson’s Photographic Magazine. Posing the girl with this magazine, probably because it was conveniently available in the studio, doesn’t seem quite appropriate. The photographer could have had her bring something personal (ie a doll) from home, or provided her with a prop more relevant for a child.  The dreamy eyed little girl in this photograph is sitting on a very interesting and unique bench. She is wearing flowers near her collar and a necklace with a locket. Northrup, the photographer of this cabinet card, was located in Bangor, Michigan.

Published in: on November 5, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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SOMEWHAT ATTRACTIVE YOUNG WOMAN IN BANGOR, MAINE

This cabinet cad features a somewhat  attractive young lady posing at a photographic studio, in Bangor, Maine. The profile image reveals an interesting hairstyle that includes braids. The photographer was George Lausil.

Published in: on July 10, 2011 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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YOUNG AND HANDSOME SALVATION ARMY WORKER IN BANGOR, PENNSYLVANIA

A handsome young man poses for this portrait in his Salvation Army uniform. His embroidered shirt is labeled “Salvation Army” and has three crosses beneath the lettering. The gentleman’s hat also is labelled “Salvation Army”. The photographer is F. I. Stofflet of Bangor, Pennsylvania.  Frank Stofflet was the subject of a law journal article (1894).  Stofflet was the defendant against T. J. Stofflett in a case involving violation of  a “no compete clause”.  )To view other cabinet card images of Salvation Army workers; click on the category “Salvation Army”.

Published in: on June 3, 2011 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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MAILMAN DELIVERS BABY IN BANGOR, MAINE

This unique cabinet card features a mailman delivering a baby. Alright, he’s not delivering the baby using traditional child birth techniques. He is delivering the baby from his mail pouch. The mailman is dressed in his full uniform and he has a relatively serious expression on his face as he poses for the photographer. The baby’s facial expression can best be described as “sour”. The cameraman is Frank C. Weston, located at 2 Smith Block,  of Bangor, Maine. Weston was a native of Maine who established himself as a photographer in the late 1870’s. His prices were “dictated by a spirit of moderation”, and he was the preferred photographer among the African American community of Bangor.

Published in: on February 22, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (5)  
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PRETTY YOUNG WOMAN WITH BANGS AND A BUN IN BANGOR, MAINE

A pretty young woman poses for her portrait at the studio of George Lansil in Bangor, Maine. Her hairstyle can be described as “Bangs and a Bun in Bangor”. She is wearing a lace collar. Research reveals that in the late 1800’s, George Lansil was described as a “painstaking, thorough artist” and one of Bangor’s finest photographers. A Maine native, he became established as a photographer in the early 1860’s. By the mid 1880’s, he was located in his Main Street studio, and had 5 assistants. His studio occupied three floors and was comprised of eight rooms.

Published in: on December 29, 2010 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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MOURNING IN PORTLAND, MAINE

This Cabinet Card may be a mourning card; a photograph of a woman in grief over the loss of a loved one. Sadness permeates this cabinet card and the woman’s expression. The photographer is Joseph Harrison Lamson (1840-1901) of Portland, Maine. The photographer’s father was a maker of daguerrotypes and his mother was an artist. He began his career in photography in Bangor, Maine and then worked in Cuba, the West Indies, and South America. He made a fortune and then bought a studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then moved to Maine and operated a photographic studio in Portland. He photographed the poets Longfellow and Whittier. When he died, his two sons took over the studio.