DORIS KENYON : ADORABLE STAGE ACTRESS : TEDDY BEAR : REAL PHOTO POSTCARD

This real photo postcard features a portrait of an adorable American film and television actress named Doris Kenyon (1897-1979). She grew up in Syracuse, New York. Her father was a minister and poet. He was a protege of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Doris studied at Packer College, and later on, at Columbia University (Barnard). Her brother was a dentist and New York assemblyman. She sang in choirs and she was “discovered” by Broadway theatrical scouts who persuaded her to pursue the stage. In 1915, at just 17 years of age, she became a chorus girl. That same year, she began her film career. She starred opposite Rudolph Valentino in a 1924 film. She married actor Milton Sills and she starred with him in “The Unguarded Hour (1925) for First National Pictures. The film company’s logo appears in the lower corner of this card’s image. It is likely that this card was published in the mid 1920’s. Kenyon successfully transitioned into sound films. She acted opposite major stars of her era. These actors included George Arliss, John Barrymore, and Ramon Navarro. Kenyon was also a talented singer. She toured the country doing concerts. Her talent also included singing in several different languages. Kenyon was also active in radio and television. Television appearances included “Secret Storm” and “77 Sunset Strip”. Kenyon appeared in five Broadway shows between 1915 and 1924. At one point in her career, she started her own production company. Kenyon married four times. She was married for ten years to her first husband until he died. Husbands two and three occupied that position for about a year each and husband four died after about four years of marriage. Interestingly, Doris Day was named Doris because her mother was a major fan of Doris Kenyon. This vintage postcard is in excellent condition (see scans).

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Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes shipping within the US) #3879

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$19.64

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Buy this Vintage Real Photo Postcard (includes International shipping outside the US) 3879

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$28.89

FAMOUS CIVIL WAR PHOTOGRAPHER CAPTURES TWO WOMEN MAKING A FASHION STATEMENT IN SNOWY PAINESVILLE, OHIO

This cabinet card features two woman dressed in their winter cloaks and hats. They are in the studio of G. N. Barnard in Painesville, Ohio. The photograph has some special effects in the form of fake falling snow. The factor that makes this photograph most special, is the photographer’s life story. George N. Barnard (1819-1902), was a pioneer of nineteenth century photography. At age 23 he was producing daguerrotypes and four years later he opened his first studio in Oswego, New York. An 1853 grain elevator fire occurred in Oswego, and Barnard captured the fire with his camera. Some historians consider these photographs the first news photography in history. In 1854 he opened a short lived studio in Syracuse, New York. He then moved to New York City where he worked on stereoscopes for Edward Anthony’s Studio in 1859 .Soon, he was hired by Matthew Brady as a portrait photographer and Brady sent him to Washington D.C. to photograph Abraham Lincoln’s 1861 inauguration as President of the United States. He later became part of “Brady’s Photographic Corps” to photograph the Civil War. Barnard is best known  for his work in the civil war (1861-1865). He was the official army photographer for the Military Division of the Mississippi, commanded by Union General William T Sherman. Barnard’s book “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” is a photographic record of Sherman’s destructive Atlanta Campaign and subsequent March to the Sea. After the war, Barnard opened a studio in Chicago in 1869. The studio was destroyed in the “Great Fire” of 1871. He proceeded to take photographs of the rebuilding of Chicago over the next few years; providing a terrific record of that process. In 1884, Barnard opened his Painesville, Ohio studio; which brings us back to the cabinet card image of the two ladies in the snow.

TURN OF THE CENTURY COUNTRY DOCTOR IN WAUKON, IOWA

This cabinet card features an older man carrying what appears to be a doctors bag. He is dressed as if he is preparing to make a winter house call to check the status of one of his patients. The doctor is wearing a buffalo coat and a fur cap. He is holding a scarf and a pair of gloves. He has a pocket watch that he probably uses to take the pulse of his patients. It must have been difficult to be a doctor in a rural area for many reasons; including having to travel great distances to visit ill patients in all kinds of weather. At least he didn’t have to deal with managed care. The Huffman and Barnard Studio produced this terrific image. Perrin Cuppy Huffman (1833-1894) was a photographer in Frankville, Iowa from 1862-1864; and than worked in Waukon, Iowa from 1865 until 1896. He was of German ancestry, born in Ohio, and settled in Iowa in 1853. His son Laton Alton Huffman became one of Montana’s foremost photographers. At times he worked with partners. His first partner was his wife, Christina Huffman.  He later was associated with the the partner listed on this cabinet card, Barnard. They were partnered between 1882-1894.

Published in: on October 14, 2010 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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