A MAN AND HIS MEDAL IN PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

This dapper gentleman is wearing a medal and ribbon as he poses for this portrait at the studio of Applegate, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. What does this medal and ribbon represent? Is this gentleman a veteran of the civil war? Is he a member of a fraternal organization or political party? The answer to these questions will be very difficult to obtain but perhaps a visitor to this site may have some ideas to share about the type of medal and ribbon the subject is wearing. The gentleman’s beard is quite interesting. He has no mustache or whiskers immediately under his lower lip. He qualifies for Cabinet Card Gallery’s category of  “Beards (Only The Best). The photographer of this cabinet card led an interesting life. In 1860, James R. Applegate had a photographic studio in Philadelphia that was three floors high. In 1877, a St. Louis photography magazine visited Applegate’s studio and wrote that he “encases 50 portrait faces every minute…. with a bevy of young ladies finishing the same and scores waiting to be set”. In 1884, Applegate opened the first successful amusement pier in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The boardwalk included one of his photography studios. In 1891, he moved the carousel from the boardwalk to Philadelphia and a year later, the police raided the carousel and arrested him and 200 guests. He was charged with “keeping a disorderly house” and an unnamed more serious offense.

CIVIL WAR VETERAN BEDECKED WITH MEDALS IN MISSOURI

cw vetThis Cabinet card is a terrific image of a union army Civil War Veteran. He is wearing three medals. One medal identifies him as J. W. Plummer, a member of company G in the 29th Indiana Infantry Regiment. The second medal represents his membership in the Civil War Veterans Group, the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.). Further research reveals that Mr Plummer, is John W. Plummer and entered his unit as a private and left with the same rank. His regiment was organized in 1861 and fought at Shiloh, Corinth, Stones River, and the Battle of Chickamauga.  The unit suffered 304  dead during the course of the war. The photographer is Tussey of Schell City, Missouri.