HANDSOME GENTLEMAN DRESSED IN FRATERNAL UNIFORM IN HAVERHILL, MASSACHUSETTS

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fraternal guy 4This cabinet card offer a clear and crisp image of a uniformed member of a fraternal organization. Hopefully, a visitor to the cabinet card gallery will be able to identify which organization the gentleman represents. The photographer of this image is Edward P. Fowler and his studio was located in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Listings of his photography business indicate that he operated at least between the years 1869 and 1880. During that time period he operated his business on Main Street and on Merrimack Street, apparently not simultaneously.

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Published in: on November 14, 2019 at 12:01 pm  Comments (2)  
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MEMBER OF A FRATERNAL ORGANIZATION IN FULL UNIFORM IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

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This cabinet card portrait features a gentleman in the full uniform of his unidentified fraternal organization. He is wearing a plumed hat and white gloves. He is holding a sword. The man, like many of his era, was likely proud of his participation in the organization. Proud enough to want to be photographed in his uniform. He likely displayed the image at home and shared copies with friends and family. The photographer of this cabinet card image, Arthur Rugg, has a number of other photographs that can be seen in the Cabinet Card Gallery. Click on the category “Photographer: Rugg” to view the images and to learn more about him. Mr. Rugg was a scoundrel. Judging by Rugg’s images in the gallery, he was also a talented photographer who had a propensity to take relatively close-up photographs.

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Published in: on January 1, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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CANADIAN COUPLE POSE IN ONTARIO, CANADA (MAN IN UNIFORM OF AN UNKNOWN ORGANIZATION)

ONTARIO COUPLE_0006A middle aged couple photographed by M. Oliver of Ontario, Canada. he is wearing what looks to be a uniform of some sort, maybe masonic. He has a ribbon and pins and looks to be wearing a sash around his waist. His cap is labeled with what may be an id number “1410” and what looks to be “L  O I”.   He may be a member of a military or fraternal organization or fire or police department.He is wearing terrific suspenders.  Lets not forget that his wife is also in the picture. She is wering a nice hat and  bow tie with jewelry on her collar. He has ribbons around his sleeves which gives them a bunch look.

Published in: on February 13, 2013 at 12:01 am  Comments (4)  
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MAN WEARING A TURBAN IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS (FRATERNAL ORGANIZATION MEMBER)

TURBAN_0002This cabinet card photograph features a middle aged man dressed in a fraternal robe and turban. It is unknown what fraternal organization his costume represents. To view a collection of other fraternal member photographs, click on the category, “Fraternal Group Members”.  The gentleman in this photograph has a  bold and thick mustache. To see other interesting mustaches, click on the category “Mustaches (Only the Best)”.  The photographer of this portrait produced an exquisite image.  The subject is well posed and the photograph has great clarity. The image was produced by the Hastings studio in Boston, Massachusetts. The studio had a branch in Newport, Rhode Island. George H. Hastings was born in Massachusetts in 1850. He operated a studio (Ritz & Hastings) with Ernest Ferdinand Ritz from sometime in the  1860’s until the 1880’s. He had his own studio from the 1880’s through sometime in the 1890’s.  The 1880 US census finds Hastings living with his brother and mother and working as a photographic artist.

FRATERNAL ORGANIZATION MAN WITH A FEATHER IN HIS HAT IN EAST CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

A gentleman poses for his portrait in the full uniform of his fraternal organization. The name of his fraternal organization is unknown to me but hopefully a visitor to this image will be able to identify it. I am sure that the crossed canes (which aren’t likely really canes) on the sash and jacket sleeves will be the major clue in accurate identification of the group. The uniform’s hat has a feather and I wonder if that is a tassel we see over his left shoulder or if it’s a turn of the century mullet. Note the man’s belt buckle and sword. The sword has an elaborate handle. Legibility problems interfere with identifying the photographer who produced this portrait. It is not an infrequent occurrence when fancy script makes it impossible to identify a photographers name on a cabinet card. Sometimes one can find the photographer’s name in such circumstances by researching the studio’s address. Such a search was done in this case but it was not productive.

Published in: on July 13, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (3)  
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A HANDSOME KNIGHT IN BUFFALO, NEW YORK (KNIGHTS TEMPLAR)

A handsome young man poses in his fraternal organization uniform at the studio of Edward Landsheft in Buffalo, New York. The previous owner of this cabinet card asserted that the uniform represents the Knights Templar, though I can not confirm his opinion as fact.  The subject of this image is holding a sword. Note the knights head on the sword pommel. Also worthy of notice are the crown and cross on his gloves and the initials “OPK” on his belt buckle. It is unknown whether “OPK” represents the man’s initials or is related to something specific in the Knights Templar culture.

Published in: on June 30, 2012 at 12:00 am  Comments (2)  
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FRATERNAL ORGANIZATION MEMBER WEARING A LARGE STAR

This cabinet card presents an image of an older man in his fraternal organization garb. Note the large star on his jacket. There is no information on the card to assist in identifying the gentleman in the photograph, nor to identify the photographer and location of  the studio. Perhaps a visitor to the Cabinet Card Gallery can examine the clothing in the image, and identify the particular fraternal organization represented in the photograph. The card stock of this cabinet card is quite thin, making it likely that the photograph was produced in the early years of cabinet card photography (1870’s or early 1880’s)

Published in: on August 28, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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“DA VINCI CODE” CABINET CARD: KNIGHTS OF THE TEMPLAR MAN IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

This cabinet card is an image of a gentleman dressed in his fraternal organization uniform. He has badges on his sash as well as on his jacket. Two of the badges have words on them that can be deciphered. The lower badge on his sash states “In Hoc Signo Vinces” which is the latin rendering of the Greek phrase, “with this as your standard you shall have victory”. This motto has been used on many coat of arms and banners including those belonging to families, cities, regiments, sport teams, and even pall mall cigarettes. More relevant to this photograph, the motto appears on the “Knight Templar Cross” in the York Rite branch of free masonry.  The second readable badge is the one located below the gentleman’s left shoulder. The badge states the name “Hugues De Payens”. Hugues De Payens (1070-1136) was a frankish knight who was the cofounder and first Grandmaster of the Knights Templar. This cabinet card conjures up thoughts of the “Da Vinci Code”. The photographer of this cabinet card is Conly of Boston, Massachusetts. Charles F. Conly went looking for a job at age 20 and found a help wanted sign in the window of famed Boston photographer, Warren (see category Photographers: Warren). Ten years later he succeeded Warren as the proprietor of the studio. He had a meteoric rise from office boy to entrepreneur. At the beginning of his career he spent some time in the theatrical profession and he thus became the favorite photographer of Boston’s theatrical performers. Conly’s obituary appears in the 1893 edition of Anthony’s Photographic Bulletin. Interestingly, the article states that Conly was a prominent secret society man and that delegations from the Elks, Odd Fellows and the Royal Arcanum and Columbian Lodge of Masons were represented at his funeral. To view other photographs by Conly, click on the category “Photographer: Conly”.

A MAN AND HIS MEDAL IN PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

This dapper gentleman is wearing a medal and ribbon as he poses for this portrait at the studio of Applegate, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. What does this medal and ribbon represent? Is this gentleman a veteran of the civil war? Is he a member of a fraternal organization or political party? The answer to these questions will be very difficult to obtain but perhaps a visitor to this site may have some ideas to share about the type of medal and ribbon the subject is wearing. The gentleman’s beard is quite interesting. He has no mustache or whiskers immediately under his lower lip. He qualifies for Cabinet Card Gallery’s category of  “Beards (Only The Best). The photographer of this cabinet card led an interesting life. In 1860, James R. Applegate had a photographic studio in Philadelphia that was three floors high. In 1877, a St. Louis photography magazine visited Applegate’s studio and wrote that he “encases 50 portrait faces every minute…. with a bevy of young ladies finishing the same and scores waiting to be set”. In 1884, Applegate opened the first successful amusement pier in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The boardwalk included one of his photography studios. In 1891, he moved the carousel from the boardwalk to Philadelphia and a year later, the police raided the carousel and arrested him and 200 guests. He was charged with “keeping a disorderly house” and an unnamed more serious offense.

LOYAL ORANGE LODGE MEMBER IN TROY, NEW YORK

This Cabinet Card is a great image of a member of a fraternal organization. The image has great clarity and the image of the sash is very detailed. The previous owner of this photograph reports that the subject of this photograph was a member of the Loyal Orange Lodge. The Orange Institution (Orange Order) is a Protestant fraternal organization based mainly in Scotland and Ireland. There are also some lodges in the Commonwealth and in the United States. The Orange Lodge organization was founded in 1796 in Ireland. The organization has had strong ties to unionism. The name of the group is derived from King William of Orange. An article appears in an  1874 edition of the New York Times that reports that the State Grand Orange Lodge Meeting was being held in Troy, New York which is the location that this photograph was taken by Lloyd’s studio. James H. Lloyd’s photographs can be found in National Magazine (1906) in a story about photographing architecture. In addition, the Photographic Journal of America (1891) announces that Lloyd was awarded a certificate of merit by the US State Department for a photograph of the Troy Polytechnic Institute. The photograph had been exhibited at the Paris Expositon.