THE WORLD’S FAIR PHOTO VIEW COMPANY PHOTOGRAPHS A BABY IN A PRAM IN MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

A cute baby looks out of her baby carriage with a look of consternation. Her safety in the pram is assured because she is wearing a safety belt. The carriage appears to be on a boardwalk although the photograph is likely taken in a studio in front of a back drop. The World’s Fair Photo View Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, took this photograph. The World’s Fair, officially titled the Milwaukee Industrial Exposition was held in Milwaukee in 1881. One of the officers of the exposition was Fredrick Pabst (1836-1904), the German-American brewer for whom the Pabst Brewing company was named. It is clear that this cabinet card photo was taken during, or shortly after 1881. This cabinet card portrait is certainly an interesting remnant of early Milwaukee, and early World’s Fair history.

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Published in: on January 26, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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PRETTY WOMAN LACED IN ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI (CIVIL WAR HERO PHOTOGRAPHER)

The attractive woman in this cabinet card is adorned with a lace cap and lace collar. Her outfit is a bit unusual but she would look beautiful no matter what she was wearing. The photographer of this image was F. W. Guerin, and his studio was located at 627 Olive Street, St. Louis, Missouri. Guerin received a medal for his work at the World Exposition in Paris (1878) and was similarly honored at the St. Louis Worlds Fair (1904). Fitz W. Guerin (1846-1903) was an excellent photographer but he was also a hero during the American Civil War. He was a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Guerin was a private in Battery A, 1st Missouri Volunteer Light Artillery. His citation states that along with two of his comrades, he voluntarily took a position aboard the steamer, Cheeseman, in which he took charge of all the guns and ammunition. He took this role while the steamer was unmanageable and under heavy enemy fire. After the war he became an apprentice photographer and later had a successful career photographing the well-to-do citizens of St. Louis. Guerin took many wonderfully posed photographs of beautiful women; he seems to have had an eye for the ladies.

GOOD TIME GIRL IN NEW YORK CITY (1897)

The following letter in inscribed on the reverse of this cabinet card. “Dear Friends, This picture I send as a token to remember the good times we had and hoping to see you all again if not in this world then in the next. From a true friend, Lizzie   This day November 4/1897”. This is a sweet letter from a girl who appears to be in her teenage years. The photographer of this cabinet card is The Robinson & Roe Photo Studios, in  New York City. The studio had operations in both Manhattan and Brooklyn. They also operated a studio in Chicago, Illinois. They were prominent photographers in the 1880’s and 1890’s. The pair of photographers are known for their photographs of Inuits from Labrador that were produced during the Worlds Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893). The Inuits were part of the Eskimo Village exhibition.