MILWAUKEE’S BEST: PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN IN BREW TOWN

This cabinet card portrait features a pretty young woman posing at the studio of Joseph Sasse in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Milwaukee’s Best isn’t just a beer brewed by the Miller Brewing Company (founded in 1855). The young woman in this photograph was likely considered one of Milwaukee’s Best eligible women by the many suitors she must have attracted. She appears to have had a fondness for jewelry evidenced by her lovely collar pin. The large buttons on her dress are interesting. In the middle of each button is a six point star. She is wearing her hair in a “Gibson Girl” type style and has a hair bow atop her head. The photographer, Joseph Sasse, according to the 1900 census, was born in Germany (1854) and married his wife Walbolia in 1888. He worked as a photographer and he is listed as working in that profession in a number of Milwaukee city directories from 1895 through 1915. He had a son, Joseph Sasse Jr. who was born in 1887. Over time his son worked as a musician and as a movie operator. The 1920 census reveals that a man named Joseph Sasse, born the same year as photographer Sasse, was divorced and an inmate in a Milwaukee jail. There is no confirmation that these are one and the same man but it certainly does seem likely.

Published in: on August 20, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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PRETTY WOMAN WITH “GIBSON GIRL” HAIRSTYLE

A pretty woman is featured in this oval photograph by an unknown photographer. The woman has a “Gibson Girl” hairstyle. It appears that a previous owner trimmed the picture to fit it into a frame.

 

Published in: on August 11, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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ROSE LEMOINE: PRETTY THEATER ACTRESS AND POSSIBLE MODEL FOR THE “GIBSON GIRL”

ROSE LEMOINETheater actress Rose Lemoine is the subject of this Cabinet Card photographed by the Dana studio of New York. The photograph was part of the Charles L. Ritzmann collection. Ritzmann was a famous importer of theatrical photographs. The attractive Ms Lemoine was thought by some to be the model or the “Gibson Girl”. This upset some Americans because Lemoine was from Cuba, not the United States and the “Gibson Girl” was illustrator Charles Dana’s personification of the feminine ideal. The “Gibson Girl” was a popular figure for twenty years (about 1890-1910). Lemoine’s mother was Cuban and her father was a French coffee planter. In 1903, the New York Times mentions Lemoine as appearing in a Broadway play called “The Best of Friends”. Also appearing in that play was Lionel Barrymore and Agnes Booth.